Category Archives: Dogs

Doggy quote of the month for April

“He and I are inseparable companions, and I have vowed him my perpetual society in exchange for his devotion.”

– English poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning, about her dog, Flush

Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Flush

Chaos returns…

Fairfax newspapers in New Zealand are reporting on the return of Chaos, a deaf dog who went missing on 15th March.  A great story, read it here.

Waitara man Marc Glover, partner Alicia James and their 3-year-old daughter Saphire-Rose, are over the moon that their dog, Chaos, was found after going missing for eight days.  (Photo by Sam Scannell, Fairfax NZ)

Waitara man Marc Glover, partner Alicia James and their 3-year-old daughter Saphire-Rose, are over the moon that their dog, Chaos, was found after going missing for eight days. (Photo by Sam Scannell, Fairfax NZ)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Lola the therapy dog

Lola, as photographed by Nancy Rubin Stuart

Lola, as photographed by Nancy Rubin Stuart

Meet Lola, a nine-year old Golden Retriever, who accompanies her owner, Dr Bodrie of Bourne, Cape Cod, to his office and on Wednesday rounds to one of six nursing facilities.    She’s a certified therapy dog!

In this article from Cape Cod.com, you can read about the Therapy Dogs International certification process that she and Dr Bodrie underwent to make her a certified therapy dog.

Lola and Dr Bodrie

Lola and Dr Bodrie

Lola's official therapy dog badge

Lola’s official therapy dog badge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A biological trigger for canine bone cancer?

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine have identified the biological mechanism that may give some cancer cells the ability to form tumors in dogs.

Yurtie, a canine cancer patient, in the UW Veterinary Care oncology ward.  Photo: Nik Hawkins

Yurtie, a canine cancer patient, in the UW Veterinary Care oncology ward.
Photo: Nik Hawkins

The recent study uncovered an association between the increased expression of a particular gene in tumor cells and more aggressive behavior in a form of canine bone cancer. It may also have implications for human cancers by detailing a new pathway for tumor formation.

The findings of the research have been published  in the journal Veterinary and Comparative Oncology and may eventually provide oncologists with another target for therapy and improve outcomes for canine patients with the disease.

The researchers examined cell lines generated from dogs with osteosarcoma, a common bone cancer that also affects people, with the intent of uncovering why only some cells generate tumors. After the dogs underwent tumor-removal surgery, cells from the tumors were grown in the lab.

This led to six different cancer cell lines, which were then transplanted into mice. The researchers then looked to see which lines developed tumors and which did not and studied the differences between them.

“We found several hundred genes that expressed differently between the tumor-forming and nontumor-forming cell lines,” said Timothy Stein, an assistant professor of oncology. However, one protein called frizzled-6 was present at levels eight times higher in cells that formed tumors.

“It’s exciting because it’s kind of uncharted territory,” says Stein “While we need more research to know for sure, it’s possible that frizzled-6 expression may be inhibiting a particular signaling pathway and contributing to the formation of tumor-initiating cells.”

The team’s genetic research will continue on dogs and be extended to humans.

Source:  University of Wisconsin-Madison media release

The Beaurepaires dog

Anyone in New Zealand notice that we have another dog-themed commercial to be proud of?

This time it is Beaurepaires, a chain of tyre (tire) retail outlets offering wheel alignments and related vehicle services.

The dog’s name is Mate and he replaces actor Vince Martin who was the face of the chain for almost 30 years.  Advertising execs felt that the marketplace is changing and they needed a hero to attract a younger audience.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Ike the dog gets a new set of wheels

Ike in his new wagon (photo courtesy of ABC News)

Ike in his new wagon (photo courtesy of ABC News)

Ike is a 15-year old dog living in California.  He’s been diagnosed with bone cancer and so only has a few months to live.  His owner, Risa Feldman, wanted to give Ike as much quality of life as possible and the traditional hind end harnesses for helping him around weren’t cutting it.

So she went into Home Depot to ask for help and two employees there did even better.  They built Ike (free of charge) a new wagon complete with a little ramp so he can get in and out easily (the back end of the wagon lifts down to form the ramp).

Ike and Risa (photo courtesy of Risa Feldman)

Ike and Risa (photo courtesy of Risa Feldman)

Risa says the wagon will help Ike enjoy their walks along Manhattan Beach for a while yet.  Whilst Risa sits down at a local cafe for a coffee, Ike usually has an order of bacon…

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Source:  ABC News

Medical marijuana for dogs?

A bill in the legislature of the State of Nevada was introduced this week that would legalize the use of marijuana in the treatment of animals.

The bill is sponsored by Democrat Tick Segerblom.  It would let owners obtain the drug for their animals if a veterinarian confirmed it “may mitigate the symptoms or effects” of a chronic or debilitating medical condition.

The same bill has provisions for the use of medical marijuana by people.

Companion Cannabis, a product as seen in a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles (Photo by Damian Dovarganes, Associated Press)

Companion Cannabis, a product as seen in a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles (Photo by Damian Dovarganes, Associated Press)

There isn’t a lot of research about the use of marijuana in animals, although there are stories of owners using it to alleviate illness symptoms in their pets – usually as a last resort when traditional therapies haven’t helped.

Physiologically speaking, dogs have a high concentration of THC receptors in their brains (THC is an active ingredient in marijuana).  As a consequence, dogs are more susceptible to marijuana and this can lead to a toxic dose.  There is evidence that in states such as Colorado, which has already legalized marijuana use, more dogs are being admitted for treatment because of marijuana toxicity after they’ve eaten their owner’s supply.

The American Veterinary Medical Association, not surprisingly, does not have an official stance on the use of medical marijuana.  Since research into the topic isn’t ‘evidence based,’ the Association merely suggests that vets make treatment decisions based on sound clinical judgment that stay in compliance with the law.

The Association says that even in states where medical marijuana is legal, it is still a Class I narcotic under federal law which means vets are not legally allowed to prescribe it; meaning that in essence the Association is saying that vets shouldn’t prescribe marijuana unless federal law is changed and they are satisfied that there is a clinical reason for doing so.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand