Category Archives: Dogs

Happy Easter!

Helga, the Bernese Mountain Dog, wishes all of our Canine Catering customers and blog subscribers a Happy Easter….

Photo by Dany Wu

Photo by Dany Wu

Golden Retrievers Bring Joy, Healing to Boston

DoggyMom.com:

The Golden Retriever comfort dogs are returning to Boston, one year on…great story!

See last year’s story in this blog post:  Luther and Ruthie go to Boston

Originally posted on The Daily Golden:

6 Golden Retrievers from the Lutheran Church Charities K9 Comfort Dogs will be in Boston to help bring joy and comfort to the thousands of people attending the area for the Boston Marathon on Monday, April 21st.  2 of the comfort dogs,  Addie and Maggie are already in Boston.  They also plan to visit hospitals and first responders.

lcc3Luther, Ruthie, Hannah and Rufus will arrive in Boston tomorrow and will be stationed at the First Lutheran Church of Boston, 299 Berkley St.- just a few blocks away from where the bombings occurred last year.  The dogs work for about 3 hours at a time and then are given a break.

Here they are with LCC president Tim Hetzner and their wonderful handlers, preparing to leave.

Photo - LCC Charities K-9 Comfort Dogs - Facebook

Photo – LCC Charities K-9 Comfort Dogs – Facebook

President of LCC Charities Tim Hetzner says

Our goal is to bring mercy…

View original 105 more words

Dogs benefit children with autism

A University of Missouri researcher has studied dog ownership decisions in families of children with autism and found that parents report a range of benefits of dog ownership including companionship, stress relief and opportunities for their children to learn responsibility.

Photo credit: Noël Zia Lee, Wikimedia Commons

Photo credit: Noël Zia Lee, Wikimedia Commons

‘Children with autism spectrum disorders often struggle with interacting with others, which can make it difficult for them to form friendships,’ said Gretchen Carlisle, the study’s author. ‘Children with autism may especially benefit from interacting with dogs, which can provide unconditional, nonjudgmental love and companionship to the children.’

Carlisle interviewed 70 parents of children with autism.  Nearly two-thirds of the parents in the study owned dogs, and of those parents, 94 percent reported their children with autism were bonded to their dogs. Even in families without dogs, 70 percent of parents said their children with autism liked dogs.

‘Bringing a dog into any family is a big step, but for families of children with autism, getting a dog should be a decision that’s taken very seriously.  If a child with autism is sensitive to loud noises, choosing a dog that is likely to bark will not provide the best match for the child and the family. If the child has touch sensitivities, perhaps a dog with a softer coat, such as a poodle, would be better than a dog with a wiry or rough coat, such as a terrier.’

The study, “Pet Dog Ownership Decisions for Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder,” was published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing earlier this year.

Source:  University of Missouri media release

For more about the benefits of dogs for people with autism, read my post Dogs are a ‘social lubricant’ in helping people with autism

Canada Post’s Adopt a Pet stamps

Canada Post’s Adopt a Pet stamps feature two dogs (as well as a two cats and a parrot) to promote the message of animal adoption.

Canada Post 3

Canada Post 2Canada Post 1

A partnership with the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies (CFHS), the stamps help to spread the word that when looking for a pet, the first stop of animal lovers should be their local humane society or SPCA.

For more about dogs on stamps, read my post on US stamps in honour of working dogs

 

 

Royal visit to New Zealand – the dog connection

Today was the last day in New Zealand for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (aka Will and Kate).  And finally, we have something dog-related from this visit!

The Duke and Duchess visited the Royal New Zealand Police College in Porirua this morning.  There, they met puppies, dogs in training, and fully-fledged police dogs.

William and Kate cuddle with police dog puppies (photo by Getty)

William and Kate cuddle with police dog puppies (photo by Getty)

A soft toy police dog was a gift to Kate, presumably for Prince George (photo by Getty)

A soft toy police dog was a gift to Kate, presumably for Prince George (photo by Getty)

And after this doggy (and soggy) visit, the Royals are now off to their next stop on the Royal Tour – Australia.   I hope Australia’s dogs will also be able to participate in their visit!

 

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Wordless Wednesday, part 30

Dogs on clotheslineBP_Wordless_wed_Hop_Logo_2014

If a pit bull could talk

Pit bull poster

DoggyMom.com and Canine Catering do not support breed specific legislation in any form!

Dogs don’t like Mondays either

I realized that quite a few of my latest posts have been about serious issues…so I decided to liven things up with a bit of fun for your Monday.

I hope you enjoy this compilation of dogs who enjoy Mondays about as much as we do!

Photo courtesy of ICanHasCheeseburger.com

Photo courtesy of ICanHasCheeseburger.com

Mondays

 

Cleft palate in dogs

UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine researchers have identified the genetic mutation responsible for a form of cleft palate in the dog breed Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers.

Photo by Danika Bannasch/UC Davis

Photo by Danika Bannasch/UC Davis

They hope that the discovery, which provides the first dog model for the craniofacial defect, will lead to a better understanding of cleft palate in humans. Although cleft palate is one of the most common birth defects in children, affecting approximately one in 1,500 live human births in the United States, it is not completely understood.

By conducting a genome-wide study of this breed with a naturally occurring cleft palate, researchers identified a mutation responsible for the development of cleft palate. Dogs with this mutation also have a shortened lower jaw, similar to humans who have Pierre Robin Sequence. The disorder, a subset of cleft palate, affects one in 8,500 live human births and is characterized by a cleft palate, shortened lower jaw and displacement of the tongue base.

Cleft palate condition occurs when there is a failure in the formation of the secondary palate, which makes up all of the soft palate and the majority of the hard palate.

The team have published their study in the journal PLOS Genetics.

Source:  UC Davis media release

Canine circovirus

Circoviruses are small viruses that survive well in the environment once shed from affected animals.  There’s a canine circovirus that was first detected in the USA in 2012, but there’s still a lot to learn.

Dogs infected with circovirus may show symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea and even death.

“Last year in Ohio and California, some dogs died of diarrhea and they couldn’t figure out the causing agent because those routine diagnostics could not pick up any pathogens that are potentially causing the diarrhea deaths,” researcher Jianfa Bai said.  Bai is a molecular diagnostician and assistant professor at Kansas State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

The Kansas State Diagnostic Laboratory has recently developed tests to identify circovirus. Researchers are still unsure how deadly this disease is. While some dogs show symptoms, 3 to 11 percent of the dogs tested at the diagnostic laboratory have been confirmed as carrying the pathogen — but are healthy and do not show symptoms.

Bai says they can’t rule out that circovirus is causing deaths. It is also possible that the deaths are caused by a combination of circovirus and another disease.

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) recommends that your dog is checked by a veterinarian if they are vomiting or have diarrhea.  Your vet can contact the laboratory at 866-512-5650 if they want to submit samples for testing.

Source:  Kansas State University media release