Category Archives: animal welfare

10 years ago…

This week marks the 10th anniversary of the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

The Hurricane Katrina Memorial at Angel's Rest, Kanab, Utah

The Hurricane Katrina Memorial at Angel’s Rest, Kanab, Utah

 

Lest we forget….

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

The dog meat trade in China

China meat trade photo

Photo courtesy of Animals Asia

Back in June, there was a lot of media attention given to the Lychee and Dog Meat Festival in Yulin, China.  This is a festival to mark the summer solstice and traditionally dog meat is on the menu.

However, many people don’t understand that the killing of dogs for meat happens year-round and not just at festival time.  Animals Asia has investigated the trade of dog meat thoroughly.

Their four reports, which I have linked here, are sobering reading.  “At every stage (of a 4-year investigation), investigators found a trade riddled with crime and extreme cruelty, violating existing laws on food safety, while those involved in the industry were highly secretive and suspicious of outside interest in their work.”

This is a trade of organized crime and a total disregard for animal welfare.

The black market for dog and cat meat in China

Lies, illegality and stolen lives report

China’s rural dogs in crisis

Survey of public attitudes to dog and cat eating in China

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Saved in America

There’s a new documentary on the horizon:  Saved in America

It’s an expose of sorts into the world of animal welfare in America with guest appearances by celebrities like Pink, Kim Kardashian and Katherine Heigl.

Not totally surprising is the fact that the larger animal welfare charities (Humane Society of United States, Best Friends Animal Society, as examples) have higher overheads and PR strategies – which soak up donor dollars.    On the other hand, I wonder what the animal welfare movement would be like if it weren’t for the larger organizations and their leadership…

Food for thought.

Here’s the trailer.  Wish I could see the whole film here in New Zealand.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

The Ark at JFK

Under construction at New York’s JFK International Airport is the world’s first all-animal airport terminal.

The facility, which will measure 178,000 square feet and cost $48 million, will be called The Ark at JFK.  Its developer, ARK Development, says the facility “has been conceived as the world’s only privately owned animal terminal and USDA-approved, full-service, 24-hour,  airport quarantine facility for import and export of horses, pets, birds and livestock.”

The terminal will be home to a 24-hour Paradise 4 Paws pet resort featuring a bone-shaped dog pool, pet suites with a flat-screen TV option, massage therapy and a jungle gym for cats.

What the bone-shaped swimming pool will look like at The Ark (courtesy of CNN)

What the bone-shaped swimming pool will look like at The Ark (courtesy of CNN)

For dogs and other pets on long-haul journeys, this facility promises to offer the highest standard in care.  Can’t wait to see it – it should be open in 2016.

Source:  CNN

Throwaway pups…

This article from the Guardian, Throwaway pup trend makes Britons dogs’ worst enemies is sobering.  It talks about disposable pups, bought with little or no knowledge of how to care for them, and fueling a demand for irresponsible breeding with the subsequent flow-on effects for animal welfare and adoptions.

But what I found really interesting is a quote from the People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals spokeswoman, Vicki Larkham.  “Millions of dogs aren’t getting off-the-lead exercise outside their home or garden for 10 minutes or more on a daily basis.  Close to a quarter of a million never go for walks on their lead for 10 minutes or more at all.  ”

A minimum of 10 minutes?  Are you kidding?

I support a minimum of 30 minutes, and twice a day.  Most sources I read suggest a minimum of 30 minutes once a day…but 10 minutes?  Where did that come from?

If you think walking a dog for 10 minutes a day will result in a happy, healthy and well-adjusted dog, you are kidding yourself.  Do everyone a favour and don’t get a dog…

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Safe Steps for Australian pets

The Victorian Government has announced a new program to help victims of domestic violence.

“Pets are an integral part of families and we know that women and children are making decisions not to flee violence because they are concerned about the future and welfare of their pet,” said Families and Children Minister Jenny Mikakos, at the launch.

It is difficult for [family violence] refuges to accept pets.”

Support group Safe Steps said threats against pets were often used as weapons by perpetrators of family violence

Support group Safe Steps said threats against pets were often used as weapons by perpetrators of family violence

“We want to be able to provide them with the support to be able to place the pet with an animal welfare shelter.”

The Government said it would provide $100,000 over the next four years and Safe Steps would work with animal welfare agencies like the RSPCA to implement the program.

The additional funding will lift capacity to house pets at risk while their family members go to shelters to escape abuse.  Until now, there has been a smaller volunteer network to take in pets in foster homes.

The connection between family violence and violence against animals is well documented.  Pets in abusive homes are often targeted and threatened and so women living in abusive situations often do not escape for fear that their animals will be harmed.

Source:  ABC News

Related post:  Sheltering people and pets from domestic violence

A unique photo series

Professional photographer Fred Levy of Maynard, Massachusetts heard about Black Dog Syndrome at the local dog park and decided to use his skills to help combat it.

As described here in my 2013 post, Black Dog Syndrome is a phenomenon reported by many shelters and rescues.  Black dogs are often depicted in movies and other media as mean, vicious and menacing.   And since many shelter don’t have lighting for ‘ambiance’ these dogs are often not seen in a flattering light.

“A dog shouldn’t be overlooked just because of its coat,” Levy said. “That’s a minor element when it comes to the dog.”

So he’s created a lovely photo series of black dogs using a black background to show off their beauty.

Here are a couple of examples:

Springer spaniel Aki

Aki, a Springer Spaniel

In this Oct. 2013 photo provided by Fred Levy, a black Labrador retriever named Denver poses in Levy's studio in Maynard, Mass. Levy, a pet photographer, first heard about “Black Dog Syndrome” in a 2013 conversation at a dog park. It’s a disputed theory that black dogs are the last to get adopted at shelters, perhaps because of superstition or a perception that they’re aggressive. The idea inspired Levy to take up a photo project on their behalf. (Fred Levy via AP)

A black Labrador retriever named Denver

And view more of the series on Fred’s website…

Great idea!

Source:  Yahoo news