Category Archives: animal welfare

Dogs in the photo booth

Rescue groups who want to increase their adoption rates may want to look at the great work being done by Guinnevere Shuster, who is social media coordinator at the Humane Society of Utah and also a professional photographer.

Ms Shuster has taken dogs out of the shelter environment and put the dogs in a photo booth setting to help show off their good looks and individual personalities.  (There are no bars in these adoption photos).

Adoption photo booth photo

When interviewed by website DIY Photography, she said It helps a great deal, almost all of these dogs have been adopted within a couple days of being posted, some even have people lining up at the front door before we open.”

What shelter wouldn’t want these results?  (And if the shelter isn’t lucky enough to have a photographer on staff, then it’s an opportunity to ask for this support from a local photographer – helping to promote their business, too).

Due to time constraints, Guinnevere can only photograph two dogs per week.  It’s a worthwhile investment of time to see the dogs placed in new forever homes.

Adoption photo 2

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

The FBI is now tracking cases of animal abuse

This year, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) will begin collecting data on animal cruelty crimes throughout the USA to prevent animal abuse and help flag those who might become violent offenders.

This is a change in departure in how statistics are kept and used.  In the past, animal cruelty was simply classified in an ‘other’ category.

The link between violent offenders and animal abuse is undeniable; animal welfare advocates have universally applauded the move.

This article in The Christian Science Monitor explains the importance of the shift.

 

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

If you are planning a trip to Italy this year…

….make sure you ask about the ferry companies working in the Gulf of Naples and don’t give your business to the company who refused to look for a puppy who fell overboard in freezing waters.

Noodles (photo from RYCC Savoia Yacht Club Facebook page)

Noodles (photo from RYCC Savoia Yacht Club Facebook page)

In late October Noodles, a Labrador puppy, was being taken to his new home with his owner on board a ferry in the Gulf of Naples.  Noodles slipped his leash and fell overboard.  The employees aboard the ferry refused to stop and look for the puppy explaining that he would be dead…

…and then along came a yacht from the RYCC Savoia Yacht Club.  And little Noodles paddled his heart out to get to them and was saved.

Noodles, shortly after rescue (photo by RYCC Savoia Yacht Club)

Noodles, shortly after rescue (photo by RYCC Savoia Yacht Club)

Noodles was reunited with his owners and has had his 5 minutes of fame.

I haven’t been able to find a reference to the ferry company by name, but certainly dog lovers should give their business elsewhere – to companies who would stop for a little lost puppy.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Jingle and Bell for the holidays

Jingle and Bell are plush/soft toys sold by Hallmark.  This year, Hallmark is donating the sum of $100,000 to Best Friends Animal Society to support animal adoption.

Jingle and Bell

When these toys are purchased from a Hallmark Gold Crown store, Hallmark will include information about Best Friends to help spread the word about the no-kill movement and the benefits of adoption.

Corporate sponsorship in the right direction, I say.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Re-purposing

I’ve heard recently that prices in local op shops (opportunity shops) and secondhand stores are on the rise with a trend towards ‘shabby chic’ and ‘vintage’ clothes.

Another trend is ‘re-purposing’ – taking a textile garment and making it into something else for an entirely different purpose.  For example, a friend ‘re-purposed’ a flannel onesie into a dog coat for Izzy.

Earlier this year, at summer camp (northern hemisphere summer), the kids of Southwest Airlines employees re-purposed a heap of old Southwest Airlines t-shirts.  They made them into dog toys for Texas-based animal shelter Operation Kindness!

Southwest Airlines t-shirt

The outdated t-shirts from Southwest Airlines became…

T-shirt dog toys

…700 dog toys!

(Photos courtesy of Operation Kindness Facebook page)

Operation Kindness logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What a great summer camp project – the kids learned to recycle and supported a good cause, too.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Professional athletes as spokespeople for animal welfare

Professional athletes in most competitive sports gain a lot of media attention for their achievements and rightly so.  Some also use their fame to help other causes, including animal welfare (and this makes me like them even more).

Some athletes, like professional baseball player David Ortiz (‘Big Papi’) of the Boston Red Sox, team with corporate sponsors to get the word out about animal adoption and shelters.  Such is the case in the video linked below, sponsored by Pedigree.

Earlier today, New Zealand’s All Blacks won a place in the Rugby World Cup final.  Sadly, I’m struggling to name an All Black that has used his fame to promote an animal welfare cause.  Please tell me if I’m wrong.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Corporate sponsorship

I’m regularly approached by charities for sponsorship of shows and other events.  I’ve been trading since 2007 and, eight years on, I have developed a sense of what I will and will not support.

Let me explain.

Sponsorship, from the smallest company to the largest, must match the goals and values of the sponsor and the receiver.  Where there is a mis-match, either one party or the other loses out.

Dog shows, for example, are often looking for products for their prize packs.  It’s an ‘easy win’ for a large company to provide bags of food and get their name onto a show program and in front of dog owners.   The recipients of these prize packs get something for free and there’s little loyalty involved.  They may never buy from the company involved again and the large corporate sponsor doesn’t mind because their goal was simply name recognition.

The same is typically not true for products and services provided by smaller businesses.  These businesses need something reciprocal in order to grow and to afford sponsorship in the future.  These businesses may donate to a cause one year, but if they receive no response from your members during the year, they are unlikely to consider sponsorship of benefit to them.

For my business, as an example, I am looking for an on-going link to the groups I support.  I am happy to provide my time and services if I feel that people will direct their business to me in the future.  I have a keen interest in helping rescue dogs, for example.  I get great personal satisfaction from helping dogs in need and when they are adopted, some come back to me as clients.

I rent space from a local training club, for example.  They give me a good rate but in return they get advertising by me bringing other dog owners to their property.  I also acknowledge their support when promoting the workshops I hold there.  Win-win.

This weekend, I sponsored a garage sale.  I did all of the promotion for the event and took time out of my business to seek donations of goods from my clients and from like-minded businesses I deal with.  The benefactor was Greyhounds as Pets (GAP), a charity that works to re-home retired racing greyhounds.

I believe in this cause because my Izzy is a greyhound who came from GAP just over a year ago.  But, more importantly, I get support from the other volunteers in this group.  They recommend me to friends, buy products from my company, and some have registered for a special massage workshop for greyhounds that I am holding.  It’s another case of win-win.

So my plea to rescue groups and other charities is to think about the owner-operated businesses in your area.  What can they do for you but also what can you do for them?

Corporate sponsorship is a different model when dealing with a smaller business and it’s based on relationships.  Please don’t approach us for ‘free stuff’ without offering anything in return.

A little boy meets a greyhound at our garage sale

A little boy meets a greyhound at our garage sale

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand