Category Archives: dog care

Willow’s surgery for cleft palate

Willow is a beautiful Beagle who was born earlier this year with a cleft lip and palate.  As part of the defect, she has a bottom jaw that is slightly forward and bucked top front teeth – so her top teeth sink into the soft tissue of her lower jaw.

Cleft lip and palate are birth defects that have been traced to genetic factors.  (see my earlier articles on Cleft Palate in Dogs and The Genetics of Cleft Lip and Palate in Dogs)

Willow, before her surgery, showing the cleft lip

Willow, before her surgery, showing the cleft lip

The inside of Willow's mouth, showing the palate deformation more clearly

The inside of Willow’s mouth, showing the palate deformation more clearly

Last week, Willow had surgery to correct her birth defect.  She’s now home but taking strong pain relief medication and sucking on ice cubes for fluids.

Willow's mouth, post-surgery

Willow’s mouth, post-surgery

Willow in her Elizabethan collar (which brother Freddie believes makes her into a scary monster)

Willow in her Elizabethan collar (which brother Freddie believes makes her into a scary monster)

We are all hoping that the surgery was successful; her Elizabeth collar comes off later this week and she’ll be re-examined.  Then her owner will discuss what can be done to help with the mis-alignment of Willow’s jaws and teeth.

Cleft lip and palate are serious defects (Willow had to be hand-fed from birth because she couldn’t nurse like normal pups; many people will ‘look the other way’ when a pup is born with these defects and let it die from malnutrition.  Thankfully, Willow’s owner Gwen Hindmarsh wasn’t willing to do that).

Surgery is expensive and painful for the dog involved.  Dogs with cleft lip and palate in their lines should not be allowed to breed, as the defects don’t always appear in every litter.

Good luck Willow!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

Yes. I tend to go a little overboard for my dogs. Am I alone?

DoggyMom.com:

I often recommend activity toys, supportive dog beds, and mobility aids like ramps and stairs…is this going over the top? I don’t think so. This lady does some wonderful things for her dogs – it’s about giving them the best life you can afford.
What have you done for your dog lately?

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Originally posted on No Dog About It Blog:

If you ask, I am sure many people would tell you that I tend to go a little overboard where my pets are concerned. (I know for sure my family would!) I tend to buy them things that I think will enrich their lives and make them happy.

I think in the case of my dogs, I wanted to make up for the bad lives they had early on. I also want them to have lives that is enriched by a wide variety of fun experiences. (What’s the fun in having a dog if you can’t enjoy the fun they have with you?)

So while I do have a logic behind what I do for my pets, I also know that I am not the norm.

After all, I …

Buy dog games for my dogs, just so they can work their brains on a cold winter’s night.

Waiting his turn

Can you help me mom? This one is hard! #doggames

Game night!

Have at least 20…

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How to Choose a Boarding Kennel for Your Pet

Just in time for the pre-Christmas madness, the Humane Society of the United States has published this very useful list of things to consider when choosing a boarding kennel for your pet.

How to Choose a Boarding Kennel for Your Pet : The Humane Society of the United States

Is your dog joining you for holiday celebrations this year, or are they going to a kennel?  In our area, most kennels are fully booked for the Christmas holiday period.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Researchers treat canine cancer

A research team at Mississippi State’s College of Veterinary Medicine is working to better understand cancer in dogs, and the work also could advance knowledge of human cancer.

MSU veterinary medicine doctoral student Shauna Trichler (l) takes a blood sample from a patient with assistance from research resident Sandra Bulla (c) and Dr. Kari Lunsford. They are part of a College of Veterinary Medicine team studying the role of platelets in diagnosing canine cancer. Photo by: Tom Thompson

MSU veterinary medicine doctoral student Shauna Trichler (l) takes a blood sample from a patient with assistance from research resident Sandra Bulla (c) and Dr. Kari Lunsford. They are part of a College of Veterinary Medicine team studying the role of platelets in diagnosing canine cancer. Photo by: Tom Thompson

Their investigation began with only a tiny blood platelet, but quickly they discovered opportunities for growth and expanding the breadth of the research.

“We have a lot to gain by looking at platelets and how they influence cancer and healing,” said Dr. Camillo Bulla. “A part of our research is looking at the platelet. The platelet is very small, but it gives us a large picture. We hope to be able to find a tumor much sooner by taking a series of blood samples to look at platelet contents.”

Bulla is an associate professor in the college’s pathobiology and population medicine department. He and Dr. Kari Lunsford, a colleague at the college, have formed the Comparative Angiogenesis Laboratory at the university to better understand this process and treat canine patients.

As he explained, cancers need the creation of new blood vessels, called angiogenesis, to survive and grow, and tumors are able to create new blood vessels as pathways to travel and spread. They also are looking at the way platelets interact with tumor cells as they attempt to spread to the area surrounding the tumor or metastasize to distant sites in the body.

Lunsford, an associate professor in the clinical sciences department, said, “We know that metastasizing tumor cells need platelets but it is not yet known what the platelets do for the migrating (metastasizing) tumor. This is one of the questions we hope to help answer.”

“If treatments are successful and the cancer goes into remission, we would monitor the patient for a relapse of the disease by looking at its platelets,” Lunsford said. “This type of monitoring would be less invasive than taking biopsies and might also be an earlier indicator that the cancer is returning.”

According to Lunsford, platelets also carry information about tumors and metastasizing cancer cells, and the team hopes that by looking at specific proteins expressed in platelets (from a simple blood sample), they can identify new cancer earlier. Even more importantly, they want to identify when tumors are about to metastasize.

“Our lab has developed a new way to separate platelets from blood samples with far less contamination by other blood cells,” she said. “This new technique was developed by doctoral student Shauna Trichler, and is superior to any isolation technique previously used by researchers in human or veterinary medicine.”

For more information, read the entire Mississippi State University press release here.

DogDaz Zoo: Pet Owners Who Are Doing It Right

Originally posted on dogdaz:

Source: pleatedjeans

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E-cigarettes are a hazard to dogs

With smoking becoming banned in most public places, smokers are turning to e-cigarettes to help them get their nicotine fix.

Nicotine is poisonous to dogs and so owners need to take special care when using e-cigarettes.    There has been a reported worldwide increase in the cases of nicotine poisoning attributed to these devices.

ecigaretteFor example, the Veterinary Poisons Information Service, which offers vets specialist advice about poisoned pets in the UK, and has seen a 300 per cent increase in dogs swallowing e-cigarettes this year.

Electronic cigarettes are battery-operated devices that deliver nicotine to the user through a vapour that looks like cigarette smoke. An atomiser in the device heats liquid containing nicotine to release the vapour, which is then inhaled.

Symptoms of nicotine poisoning may include heavy panting, drooling, vomiting, diarrhoea, agitation and nervousness often combined with an increase in heart and respiration rates.  The symptoms can escalate to tremors, seizures, comas, cardiac arrest and even death.

In the UK this year, a dog died after eating the nicotine capsule from an e-cigarette when it was dropped on the floor.

The ASPCA (USA) has also published warnings about e-cigarettes and pets.  They say:

These are factors that make e-cigs and the liquid nicotine within them different than that found in cigarettes, patches or chewing gum:

  • Potentially a high nicotine concentration of 1 to 10 percent
  • The product may often be poorly labeled
  • Liquid formation that means absorption more quickly for faster onset of signs, leaving less time for decontamination efforts
  • While carriers in the e-cig liquid may be propylene glycol and glycerin, there have been reports of them containing diethylene glycol, which can cause acidosis and kidney injury
  • Products may be flavored, such as milkshake or chocolate, making them more attractive to pets

Hopefully, the above facts make you want to throw away any e-cigarettes you may have in your house.   And today is a great day to start your stop smoking plan (since cigarette smoke, cigarettes, nicotine patches and gum all are hazards too).

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

The ultimate in pet-friendly homes

  • Building a new house?
  • Does your family include at least one pet?

Well then, Standard Pacific Homes in Irvine, California has the answer for you.  For an additional $35,000, your new home can include a pet suite.

Pet suites are all about convenience and include dual purpose cabinets for owner/dog and dedicated laundry facilities so the dog hair stays with your dog’s bedding and coats.  There’s even a camera to keep an eye on your dog when you are not at home.

More in this news item:

If I were building in Christchurch right now, I’d be seriously thinking of adding a pet suite to my new home.  It would be another way of including dogs in the rebuild!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand