Category Archives: dog care

Behind the scenes in canine blood donation

Animals, including dogs, may need blood donations at critical points in their lives.

The University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna has operated a blood bank for dogs for more than a decade. 

Reasons for a blood transfusion among dogs (and cats) are usually serious accidents, large operations, certain types of cancer, cases of intoxication with rodent poison, serious infectious diseases such as the tick-borne babesiosis, and blood illnesses including haemolytic or inherited bleeding disorders such as haemophilia.

At the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna dog owners can bring their animals to donate blood regularly or as needed. Blood donations two to four times a year per dog is the maximum. About 15 minutes are required for a donation. Dogs must have a minimum weight of 25 kilograms and usually donate about 450 millilitres of blood at each session.

Photo by Felizitas Steindl / Vetmeduni Vienna

Photo by Felizitas Steindl / Vetmeduni Vienna

Animal blood, as well as human blood, is divided into various groups based on different surface proteins found on the red blood cells. More than twelve different blood type systems have been described for dogs, although in practice dogs are only tested for DEA 1.1 positive or DEA 1.1 negative.

Dogs can be registered as blood donors at the Clinical Unit of Internal Medicine Small Animals of the Vetmeduni Vienna. The donors receive a donor card and undergo a thorough examination before each donation. This mandatory health check includes a complete blood count, a test for blood parasites, and a check-up for viral infections.

“Donating blood does not harm the animals. The donated amount can be quickly regenerated by the animal’s organism,” says  specialist for small animal internal medicine and blood bank coordinator Nicole Luckschander-Zeller. “We pay special attention to making sure that donor animals feel good during donation. That’s why, after every donation, we give the animals a little snack.”

Dog blood is not only used as a whole. Individual blood components, such as plasma or erythrocyte concentrates, are stored and used when needed.

Source:  Vetmeduni Vienna media release

 

Special needs pets can make great companions

(Photo: Sara C. Tobias/The Advocate)

Pickles, a Pug with no eyes (Photo: Sara C. Tobias/The Advocate)

In this story (link below), the Newark Advocate talks about the adoption of pets with special needs and why their owners wouldn’t think twice about doing it again.

Meet, for example, Pickles.  Pickles’ eyes were surgically removed for health reasons but she still enjoys life!

Special needs pets can make great companions.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

A smartphone for you and your dog

Motorola has unveiled the Scout 5000, a smartphone for dogs

Smartphone for dogs

The device, which is WiFi and Bluetooth enabled, will monitor a dog’s health, track their location with GPS and allow owners, when they are not home, to speak to their dogs using 3G.   A microphone will allow the dog to be heard, too.

There is also a built-in camera so owners can check on what their dogs are up to.

Scout 5000

Motorola says the Scout 5000 will be available in the USA in June and carry a $199 price tag; a version for small dogs will be $91.  The device will come with a year of 3G service, after which owners will need to purchase a data plan.

Technology has, again, gone to the dogs!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Dogs in strollers: real men do it!

I’m so happy to be able to share these photos.

Kenny is a Blue Heeler/Bull Terrier cross.  Now 12, he’s survived a car accident when a puppy and then a stroke in 2011.

Not surprisingly, Kenny has a few mobility issues.  His back gets sore and his left side is weaker.   He gets regular massage and laser treatments from me which help to keep him more comfortable and mobile.

Like many other senior dogs with a few aches and pains, Kenny still wants to join his family when they go out.  Sometimes he makes it into his favourite park but then struggles on the way back to the car.

The solution, when Kenny gets tired, is to put him in a stroller.

Kenny with dad, Jason (photo by Elesha Ennis)

Kenny with dad, Jason (photo by Elesha Ennis)

Many men seem reluctant to be seen walking their dog in a stroller.  I say “Real men are happy to show that they care and love their dog”.  All credit to Jason, Kenny’s dogfather.

Dogs with mobility issues can live full and active lives with a little help.  Kenny is far better off getting the mental stimulation of family outings than he is being left at home.  Senior dog care requires management techniques; strollers and carts can play their part.

It's a long way back to the car...thanks Dad!  (Photo courtesy of Elesha Ennis)

It’s a long way back to the car…thanks Dad! (Photo courtesy of Elesha Ennis)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Snow Doggies

DoggyMom.com:

For those of us who have been sweltering in the heat this southern hemisphere summer, check out these snow dogs!

Originally posted on Nikitaland:

I love our dogs! There is nothing that I would not do for them. I will never get tired of seeing them sit in the front door together, side by side, watching the cars, deer (aka “Big Doggies”), an occasional kitty, and the police cars that patrol the area.

BELLA AND NIKITA BY FRONT DOOR

This is Bella’s other new sweater! She looks like a little lady bug in her new pink sweater with black polka dots! I used a neat photo effect on this photo called colored pencil. I love how it brought out Bella’s coloring and defined the bricks on the house.

BELLAS NEW SWEATER2

Bella loves her new sweaters because she is now nice and warm and her butt is now covered well too!

BELLA PINK SWEATER

What is the funnest thing to do when it snows? Build Snow Doggies! Here is my rendition of Nikita and Bella as Snow Doggies! I can’t even tell you how…

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Lost Dogs – Is your dog at risk?

DoggyMom.com:

I really like the checklist in this item. Sometimes, without thinking, we put our dogs at risk. Losing a dog would be one of the most heartbreaking things that any of us experience – let’s re-think our habits before it is too late.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Originally posted on No Dog About It Blog:

IMG_6838I’m often brought to tears by stories of lost dogs that have been found.

Just this past weekend, a ten-year-old dog was found after being lost and out on her own for several days in frigid temps. As I read her owner’s teary and thankful response to all those who helped her get her dog back, I wept.

I remember the powerful waves of emotion that swept over me when I finally had Cupcake back in my arms again – relief, gratitude, and extreme happiness. Even though it has been three years since Cupcake went missing, I have never forgotten those twelve days she was gone. I have only to read another lost dog story or see another missing dog posting, to feel all the fear, worry and sadness all over again.

Losing a dog (no matter how long) changes you. It makes you more cautious, and more attentive. It also makes you less likely…

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Sarah’s Something Special Day

DoggyMom.com:

This is a great idea for multi-dog households. Every fur baby needs one on one time!

Originally posted on Adventures at Run A Muck Ranch:

Recently, we instituted mandatory Something Special Days.   Once a week, each dog is to be separated from The Hoard for 100% attention.  No cell phone, no distractions, just 100% attention focused on one dog.

Today was Sarah’s Something Special Day.

As an added bonus, she had both Crabby and me there to share it with her.

Does this look like a happy girl to you?

DSC_4719

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