Category Archives: dog-friendly shops

One out of every three cars in the drive thru…

Courtesy of Reyes, Maggie (Photographer). March 2015

Courtesy of Reyes, Maggie (Photographer). March 2015

A survey by market research firm Relevation Research, based in Illinois, has shown that 1 out of every 6 US households buys fast food for a dog during at least some of their drive-thru or take-out window visits.  At this rate, over 1,000,000,000 visits annually are catering to a dog.

One third of dog owners  drive through with their dog in the car; four-fifths of those actually claim to order something specifically for the dog.  McDonald’s is visited most often for the dog followed by Burger King and Wendy’s.  Starbucks is patronized less despite offering Puppy Whip/Puppuccino.

Nan Martin, principal at Relevation Research, advises that QSRs (known as quick service restaurants in the ‘biz’) should team up with dog food/treat manufacturers to design dog-safe offerings at their establishments.

In Christchurch, McDonald’s outlets usually stock dog treats at their drive-thru windows.  If your dog rides in the back seat, the window attendant doesn’t always notice and so you have to ask for dog treats.  And the only surviving Starbucks outlet (thanks to our earthquakes) doesn’t offer a drive-thru, let alone Puppuccinos.

(I’m a big fan of Starbucks coffee and so – please – open a drive-thru branch here and please stock it with Puppuccinos.  Izzy and I would be frequent customers.)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Source:  PR Newswire media release

 

Outdoor dining in California (bone appetit)

California’s Governor Jerry Brown has signed into law Assembly Bill 1965.  The law will take effect on 1 January 2015 and will officially remove a ban on pets in restaurants.

For restaurants who want to allow dogs in their outdoor dining areas, the law officially allows them to do so.  (Technically, restaurants that have allowed dogs in patio and other outdoor areas were breaking the law.)

This lead to inconsistent enforcement across the State.

Gary Ellis, left, and his dog Wilco, a Saluki, enjoy dinner at Zazie restaurant in San Francisco. Photo: Brant Ward, San Francisco Chronicle

Gary Ellis, left, and his dog Wilco, a Saluki, enjoy dinner at Zazie restaurant in San Francisco. Photo: Brant Ward, San Francisco Chronicle

“Amidst all the horrific and depressing news around us, I hope this bill helps make people a little happier, and businesses who wish to accommodate diners with dogs safe from being unnecessarily cited,” said assembly member Mariko Yamada, who championed the bill, on her Facebook page.

To comply, a restaurant must have an outdoor entrance that doesn’t require the pet to walk through the restaurant to get to the outdoor area and pets are not allowed in areas of food preparation.

“It will soon be legal to take your beagle with you to dinner,” Yamada said.   “I wish everyone ‘bone-appétit’.”

Bed, Bath & Beyond (Chelsea, New York)

If you’re traveling through New York with your pooch, you should stop at Bed, Bath & Beyond in Chelsea, New York.

This store welcomes dogs (on leash and under control) and provides them with special canine shopping carts that have foam mats at the bottom for comfort.

This is Enzo, a French Bulldog, shopping at the store:

Enzo at Bed Bath and Beyond

Well done to Bed, Bath and Beyond at this location.  No word yet on when other stores will follow suit.

Three Ferraris for man’s best friend

Well done to Museo Ferrari Maranello; the Ferrari Museum has recognised that car lovers may also be dog lovers who are traveling with their pooch.

The solution?  Guarded kennels in the shaded part of the museum garden which is located next to the cafeteria.

Photo courtesy of Museo Ferrari Maranello

Photo courtesy of Museo Ferrari, Maranello

In three different sizes (to cater for dogs of all sizes), these kennels replicate in detail the classic Ferrari motor car which is built in Maranello.

Your dog will experience a Ferrari cockpit like no other.  Photo courtesy of Museo Ferrari, Maranello

Your dog will experience a Ferrari cockpit like no other!  Photo courtesy of Museo Ferrari, Maranello

Now that’s dog-friendly business!  Does the museum near you cater for your dog?

The Shake Shack’s dog menu

The Shake Shack is a chain of restaurants that originated in New York as a hot dog stand in Madison Square Park.  Serving frozen custard, burgers and other drinks, the restaurants are currently found in six states and internationally.

Shake dog biscuits

What makes this restaurant chain very special is that they serve dog biscuits, too.  Since the chain started as a mobile hot dog stand, doggy customers have been part of the history of the chain and the chain sells dog treats as a way of honouring that history.

When buying products at the Shake Shack, you can also buy:

Pets welcome in many workplaces

I tip my hat to the Indianapolis Star for its recent excellent coverage of pet-friendly workplaces in Indiana.

Take Inverse-Square, where Bob Baird takes his German Shepherd to work with him in a demanding job where he leads a team of systems integration specialists.  His online profile on the company’s website clearly lists him as a ‘dog enthuasiast.’ Company employee Anne Marie DeLa Rosa reports that ‘When I’m stressed, I usually call Zoe (a chocolate Labrador retriever) over and rub her ear. That’s my therapy.’

DeLa Rosa also reports that because Zoe is in the office, she’ll take a proper lunch break which includes a short walk.

Inverse-Square is located in The Stutz office park where commercial developer Turner Woodard made it possible for employers to have pet-friendly office policies.  The newspaper reports that 25 percent of the tenants take advantage of the perk.  Two other properties developed by Woodard — the Canterbury Hotel and Wasatch Lake — are also pet-friendly.

Other Indiana companies that are pet-friendly include:

Jacobs Law office: Sam Jacobs allows his office manager Karie Jacobs, 28, to bring her Cockapoo to the office.  Sam has declared that ‘Larry is a wonderful diversion…I can talk to him and he doesn’t talk back.’

Gradison Design Build:   This company includes two Great Danes, one Labrador retriever and a Yorkshire terrier.

Pack leader David Gradison, 75, says ‘They are like family and we’re a family environment.’

Indiana Lighting:   Bella Mia, a Peekapoo, comes to work in Tracy Leeper King’s handbag. ‘She comes to work because she brings joy, positive energy and gives the employees a break from their desks.’

Rusted Moon Outfitters: The company spokeperson is an English Setter named Rosemary.  On the company’s website they  happily announce ‘We’re ready to answer your questions and help you find the gear you need. Visit us in Broad Ripple, just off the Monon Trail. Oh yeah, bring your dog too.’  A photo of Rosemary declares ‘Rosemary says Dogs Welcome’  Yes – this store is also a dog-friendly shopping destination.

Beer for dogs?

I seem to be developing a theme of late…it started with my posts about dogs in the world of wine.  Closer to home, those who have joined Canine Catering on Facebook know that we are having a bit of a argument in the local media about  dogs being allowed in outdoor cafes and bars.  Yes – believe it or not – that’s the state of play here when it comes to dog-friendly establishments – so many just haven’t tapped the market for the dog owner.

And now…this post is about beer for dogs.  Dawg Grog.  It’s made in Bend Oregon by a beer lover named Daniel Keeton who is also passionate about his pooch, Lola Jane.  Since Daniel works in a brew house named the Boneyard Brewery, he wanted Lola Jane to be able to share in his work.

Dawg Grog is a brew using the Boneyard Brewery’s malted barley water, glucosamine and organic vegetable broth.  It can be served as a treat or over food.  It’s available in all 50 US states.  A six-pack is $36.
I’m really impressed by the ingredients used in this product and it’s encouraging to see dog owners continuing to find ways of caring for their dogs and involving them in their everyday work.

Here’s a good YouTube video about Daniel’s invention: