Dogs in strollers: real men do it!

I’m so happy to be able to share these photos.

Kenny is a Blue Heeler/Bull Terrier cross.  Now 12, he’s survived a car accident when a puppy and then a stroke in 2011.

Not surprisingly, Kenny has a few mobility issues.  His back gets sore and his left side is weaker.   He gets regular massage and laser treatments from me which help to keep him more comfortable and mobile.

Like many other senior dogs with a few aches and pains, Kenny still wants to join his family when they go out.  Sometimes he makes it into his favourite park but then struggles on the way back to the car.

The solution, when Kenny gets tired, is to put him in a stroller.

Kenny with dad, Jason (photo by Elesha Ennis)

Kenny with dad, Jason (photo by Elesha Ennis)

Many men seem reluctant to be seen walking their dog in a stroller.  I say “Real men are happy to show that they care and love their dog”.  All credit to Jason, Kenny’s dogfather.

Dogs with mobility issues can live full and active lives with a little help.  Kenny is far better off getting the mental stimulation of family outings than he is being left at home.  Senior dog care requires management techniques; strollers and carts can play their part.

It's a long way back to the car...thanks Dad!  (Photo courtesy of Elesha Ennis)

It’s a long way back to the car…thanks Dad! (Photo courtesy of Elesha Ennis)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Snow Doggies

DoggyMom.com:

For those of us who have been sweltering in the heat this southern hemisphere summer, check out these snow dogs!

Originally posted on Nikitaland:

I love our dogs! There is nothing that I would not do for them. I will never get tired of seeing them sit in the front door together, side by side, watching the cars, deer (aka “Big Doggies”), an occasional kitty, and the police cars that patrol the area.

BELLA AND NIKITA BY FRONT DOOR

This is Bella’s other new sweater! She looks like a little lady bug in her new pink sweater with black polka dots! I used a neat photo effect on this photo called colored pencil. I love how it brought out Bella’s coloring and defined the bricks on the house.

BELLAS NEW SWEATER2

Bella loves her new sweaters because she is now nice and warm and her butt is now covered well too!

BELLA PINK SWEATER

What is the funnest thing to do when it snows? Build Snow Doggies! Here is my rendition of Nikita and Bella as Snow Doggies! I can’t even tell you how…

View original 77 more words

Going to the dog park via public transport

Eclipse, a Black Labrador living in Seattle, has made the local news…  She’s so enthusiastic about going to the dog park, she often takes herself there – on the bus!

Enjoy this story about a special black Lab!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

I may be neurotic…but that makes me a good dog mom

I am conscientious and reliable.  From an early age, I also had a strong sense of self-preservation when it came to putting myself in potentially dangerous situations.  To some, that makes me neurotic.  However, that’s not such a bad thing, according to new research out of the University of California at Berkeley and California State University.


Helicopter parenting may not be the best strategy for raising independent kids. But a healthy measure of clinginess and overprotectiveness could actually be advantageous when rearing dogs and cats, according to new research from UC Berkeley and California State University, East Bay.

A Web-based survey of more than 1,000 pet owners nationwide analyzed the key personality traits and nurturing styles of people who identified as a “cat person,” a “dog person,” “both” or “neither.”

Surprisingly perhaps, those who expressed the greatest affection for their pets also rated among the most conscientious and neurotic, suggesting that the qualities that make for overbearing parents might work better for our domesticated canine and feline companions, who tend to require lifelong parenting.

“The fact that higher levels of neuroticism are associated with affection and anxious attachment suggests that people who score higher on that dimension may have high levels of affection and dependence on their pets, which may be a good thing for pets,” said Mikel Delgado, a doctoral student in psychology at UC Berkeley and co-author of the study, recently published in the Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science.

The results echo those of a 2010 study by University of Texas psychologist Sam Gosling, a UC Berkeley graduate, which showed dog owners to be more extroverted, but less open to new experiences, and cat owners to be more neurotic, but also more creative and adventurous.

While previous studies have focused on people’s attachment to their pets, this is the first U.S. study to incorporate the principles of human attachment theory – which assesses the bond between parents and children or between romantic partners — with pet owners’ personality types, including whether they identify as a “dog person” or “cat person.”

It is also the first to find a positive correlation between neuroticism, anxious attachment and the care of and affection for pets, said CSU-East Bay psychologist Gretchen Reevy, co-author of the paper and a graduate of UC Berkeley.

Delgado and Reevy recruited male and female pet owners of all ages through the Craigslist classified advertising website, their personal Facebook pages and pet-related pages on the Reddit news and social networking site. Nearly 40 percent of those surveyed said they liked dogs and cats equally, while 38 percent identified as dog people and 19 percent as cat people. A mere 3 percent favored neither.

The online questionnaire was based on both human and animal attachment assessments, including one that measures the “Big Five” overarching human characteristics (openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and neuroticism). Pet owners were also rated according to the Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale, which measures affection for pets, and the Pet Attachment Questionnaire, which gauges “anxious attachment” and “avoidant attachment.”

People who score high on anxious attachment tend to need more reassurance from the objects of their affection, and in the survey those tended to be younger people who chose a cat as a favorite pet.

Conversely, people who rate highly on avoidant attachment, which refers to a less affectionate and more withdrawn temperament – and can inspire such rejoinders as “commitment-phobe” in romantic relationships – are much less needy. Both dog and cat lovers scored low on avoidant attachment, suggesting both personality types enjoy close relationships with their pets.

“We hypothesized that more attentive and affectionate pet owners would receive higher affection scores and lower avoidant attachment scores, as higher levels of avoidant attachment would suggest distancing behaviors between the individual and their pet,” Delgado said.

Delgado and Reevy plan to dig more deeply into the link between neuroticism and affection for and dependence on one’s pet.

“We will investigate further whether greater affection for and greater anxious attachment to one’s pet, and neuroticism, are associated with better care and understanding of the pet’s needs,” Reevy said.

Source:  UC Berkeley media release

Bullseye! The mascot of the Target Corporation

The value of dogs in advertising cannot be underestimated.  Just ask the Target Corporation, a chain of discount stores in the United States.

Their mascot is Bullseye, a bull terrier.

Photo by Target Corporation

Photo by Target Corporation

Bullseye features in print media and television campaigns and appears ‘in person’ at corporate events including store openings.  In October 2014, for example, Target opened a CityTarget store in Boston, not far from famed Fenway Park.

To mark the occasion, the company did photo shoots of Bullseye at various famous locations around the city.  Now that’s public relations!

Bullseye apparently lives on a ranch just north of Los Angeles with her trainers.  Over the years, there have been many Bullseyes (just like there were successive Lassies over the years).  The company has also proudly reported that the makeup used on Bullseye is non-toxic and natural.

Bulleye is so popular that Target offers a range of products featuring Bullseye in its Bullseye Shop.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Autistic children who live with pets are more assertive

Yet another piece of research that points to the value of dogs and other animals.  This time the research was done at the University of Missouri and focused on the social skills of autistic children.

You guessed it – the children who lived with pets developed better social skills including assertiveness.  “When I compared the social skills of children with autism who lived with dogs to those who did not, the children with dogs appeared to have greater social skills,” said Gretchen Carlisle, Research Fellow.

Source:  University of Missouri press release

The best ball boys in the world

The ASB Classic tennis tournament finished yesterday with Venus Williams winning the title.  But the real high point of the tournament was the advertising…

Meet the Best Ball Boys in the World: Oscar the Mastiff cross, Ted the Border Colies, and Teddy, the Jack Russell cross…

If dogs were allowed in ‘real’ tennis matches, I think I could become a fan!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand