DogDaz Zoo: Pet Owners Who Are Doing It Right

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Teddy’s journey: house protection

Jill has been working to ‘Teddy-proof’ her home so that Teddy can be left alone in the house but without any hazards that could cause him harm.

Our biggest concern is Teddy jumping off of furniture (something he did regularly in his quadruped days).

The focus initially was on having soft landings for Teddy and furniture with very high seats has been removed/relocated.  But, in Teddy’s enthusiasm to be a good guard dog, he would often climb onto the back of the sofa and jump from that height.  This would be extremely dangerous for Teddy now that he has only one front leg and with arthritis forming in the paw of that leg, too.

Solution:  Jill purchased puppy fencing and has permanently attached it to the sofa.  Teddy can safely get up on the sofa (with padding on the floor for when he dismounts), but he can’t jump off the back because he’s effectively caged in.  (Jill’s husband says that the sofa fencing doesn’t make any difference to the comfort of the sofa.  Teddy agrees).

What do you think about her protection efforts?

Sofa protection 2

Sofa protection

Teddy continues to improve, although he requires more strengthening in his core, and Jill has made this their new priority.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Hapless huskies, dumped dalmatians: let’s stop treating pets as disposable

I like this opinion piece which discusses puppy mills, exotic pets and even the link between popular culture (movies, etc.) and the demand for certain breeds of dog.

Mr Barkham (no pun intended) talks about the need to strengthen requirements to underpin a culture that expects responsible pet ownership.  My favourite quote “Buying a big pet should be like obtaining a mortgage – an agonising process with loads of ludicrous red tape that ensures we really want the burden of an animal in our lives for a decade or more.

Click on the link to read more:

Hapless huskies, dumped dalmatians: let’s stop treating pets as disposable | Patrick Barkham | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

'The Blue Cross has seen a 700% increase in husky-type dogs being given up or abandoned over the past five years, with 78 taken in last year.' Photograph: Andrew Milligan/PA

‘The Blue Cross has seen a 700% increase in husky-type dogs being given up or abandoned over the past five years, with 78 taken in last year.’ Photograph: Andrew Milligan/PA

 

Lucy and Remi: 2 great dog stories in 2 days

From the New Zealand papers this week…Lucy the dog helps save her owner when she falls down a cliff and Remi, a naughty Bull Terrier, alerts his owner to help save a trapped motorist.

Read the links – great stories!

Nikita McMurtrie and her dog, Lucy (Photo by Mytchall Bransgrove)

Nikita McMurtrie and her dog, Lucy (Photo by Mytchall Bransgrove)

Loyal Lucy alerts mum – national | Stuff.co.nz

Angel Marsh with Remi; credited with saving a man trapped in a wrecked car (Photo by Fairfax NZ)

Angel Marsh with Remi; credited with saving a man trapped in a wrecked car (Photo by Fairfax NZ)

Dog helps owner to find crash victim – national | Stuff.co.nz

Wordless Wednesday, part 50

Photo by Jill Gordon

Photo by Jill Gordon

Blog Hop

E-cigarettes are a hazard to dogs

With smoking becoming banned in most public places, smokers are turning to e-cigarettes to help them get their nicotine fix.

Nicotine is poisonous to dogs and so owners need to take special care when using e-cigarettes.    There has been a reported worldwide increase in the cases of nicotine poisoning attributed to these devices.

ecigaretteFor example, the Veterinary Poisons Information Service, which offers vets specialist advice about poisoned pets in the UK, and has seen a 300 per cent increase in dogs swallowing e-cigarettes this year.

Electronic cigarettes are battery-operated devices that deliver nicotine to the user through a vapour that looks like cigarette smoke. An atomiser in the device heats liquid containing nicotine to release the vapour, which is then inhaled.

Symptoms of nicotine poisoning may include heavy panting, drooling, vomiting, diarrhoea, agitation and nervousness often combined with an increase in heart and respiration rates.  The symptoms can escalate to tremors, seizures, comas, cardiac arrest and even death.

In the UK this year, a dog died after eating the nicotine capsule from an e-cigarette when it was dropped on the floor.

The ASPCA (USA) has also published warnings about e-cigarettes and pets.  They say:

These are factors that make e-cigs and the liquid nicotine within them different than that found in cigarettes, patches or chewing gum:

  • Potentially a high nicotine concentration of 1 to 10 percent
  • The product may often be poorly labeled
  • Liquid formation that means absorption more quickly for faster onset of signs, leaving less time for decontamination efforts
  • While carriers in the e-cig liquid may be propylene glycol and glycerin, there have been reports of them containing diethylene glycol, which can cause acidosis and kidney injury
  • Products may be flavored, such as milkshake or chocolate, making them more attractive to pets

Hopefully, the above facts make you want to throw away any e-cigarettes you may have in your house.   And today is a great day to start your stop smoking plan (since cigarette smoke, cigarettes, nicotine patches and gum all are hazards too).

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

In India, a dog tops the menu for the leopard population

A new study led by the Wildlife Conservation Society reveals that in India’s human dominated agricultural landscapes, where leopards prowl at night, it’s not livestock that’s primarily on the menu – it is man’s best friend.

Photo courtesy of Wildlife Conservation Society

Photo courtesy of Wildlife Conservation Society, India

The study, which looked at scat samples for leopards in India’s Ahmednagar’s district in Maharashtra, found that 87 percent of their diet was made up of domestic animals. Domestic dog dominated as the most common prey item at 39 percent and domestic cats were second at 15 percent.

The authors of the study say that the selection of domestic dogs as prey means that the economic impact of predation by leopards on valuable livestock is lower than expected. Thus, human-leopard “conflict” is more likely to be related to people’s fears of leopards foraging in the proximity of their houses and the sentimental value of dogs as pets.

Study co-author Ullas Karanth, WCS Director for Science-Asia, said: “During the past two-to-three decades, legal regulation of leopard hunting, increased conservation awareness, and the rising numbers of feral dogs as prey have all led to an increase in leopard numbers outside of nature reserves in agricultural landscapes. While this is good news for conservation and a tribute to the social tolerance of Indian people, it also poses major challenges of managing conflict that occasionally breaks out. Only sound science can help us face this challenge.”

Source:  Wildlife Conservation Society media statement