Tag Archives: chew toys

Managing dental health

Yesterday, Daisy had a dental cleaning at our vet’s.  She didn’t really have dog breath but her annual examination revealed that her teeth weren’t in the best condition.   She didn’t need any extractions, but she had gingivitis in her rear teeth and, as it turns out, signs of receding gums.

Daisy is a senior girl and we absolutely can’t risk having another procedure where she requires anesthesia.

I have really tried to support her mouth health through 2-3 times per week brushing with dog toothpaste and the feeding of dental chews.  She doesn’t tolerate raw bones well – which routinely either over-stimulate her bowels or cause constipation.  (When she shared a kennel with her father once a week at daycare, it was great because she could chew on his cast-offs without these problems.)

Daisy is also rather picky and so she won’t chew on chew toys like the twisted rope chews (I think she believes it’s beneath her).  If food/taste isn’t involved in the chew, she’s just not interested.

So, what’s next for our regime?

Well, the first thing is making brushing of her teeth a daily event.  I’m motivated to do this because I know the consequences of not doing it and luckily, Daisy is used to it.

But I want to do more and preferably in as natural a way as possible.

I’m also going to try homeopathics.  The two that come recommended are fragaria and calc renalis because these  keep tartar soft and more able to be removed through chewing and brushing.  The standard 30C concentrations are what we are going to start with by adding it to her water bowl.  If you can’t source the individual remedies, many of the homeopathic mixtures on the market contain these active ingredients.  In New Zealand, BioPet comes recommended.

I’ve also read that boiled oxtail is a good chew.  So I’m off to find oxtail at the supermarket/butcher.  I’m also hopeful of finding other chews that Daisy will tolerate – I’m going to source a deer antler chew shortly.

Remember, that dental health is essential.  I’ve previously written about this subject in Dog breath is no laughing matter.

Please feel free to share what you do to keep your dog’s teeth in top condition either through this blog or the Canine Catering Facebook page.  (Yes, I know about the raw diet – but Daisy hasn’t tolerated even a managed transition to raw feeding in the past.   I’m not against feeding raw, I just know from my practice that not all dogs are suited to the raw diet for a range of reasons).