Tag Archives: dogs

Cute and cuddly…to start your weekend

I know I cover a lot of serious topics on this blog…but every now and again it’s time to simply celebrate dogs in all their shapes and sizes.

I have just found this site – Animals with Stuffed Animals – a compilation of photos showing pets with their own soft toys.   Too cute!

Here are a few examples…go to the site to see more.  And have a great weekend!

 

Source:  imgur

Source: imgur

Source:  bassets

Source: bassets

SOF dogs and their memorial

Photo courtesy of SOF K9 Memorial Foundation

Photo courtesy of SOF K9 Memorial Foundation

Special Operations Forces (SOF) dogs are very special indeed.  These dogs serve on tours of duty in places like Iraq and Afghanistan and help to detect explosives and intervene when their handler or other soldiers are in danger.  Many SOF dogs never make it to retirement because they are killed in action.

A very special statute to honour these dogs has been placed at the Airborne and Special Operations Museum in Fayetteville, North Carolina.  Fort Bragg, which has a SOF kennel, is not far away.

SOF dog statue

When unveiled in July 2013, dog handlers from the various wars including Vietnam and WWII were in attendance.  These men have enjoyed a very special bond with their animals and often the handler adopts their dog once it has been retired from active duty.

Handlers who have lost their dog can apply to have a memorial stone placed in the surround of the statue.  There is also funding available for handlers to have memorials erected at their home base.

The SOF K9 Memorial Foundation welcomes donations to their cause from military personnel and others who want to honour the service of these remarkable dogs.

 

Treating enlarged prostate (BPH) in dogs

Benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH, is the medical term for an enlarged prostate.   The condition affects older, entire dogs and humans.

The most common clinical sign of BPH in dogs is bloody fluid dripping from the penis not associated with urination. In severe cases it can obstruct the colon and result in constipation.

A new method to treat dogs with BPH is pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF).  PEMF is a noninvasive method that generates both an electrical and magnetic field and is used in orthopedics, neurology, and urology.  Because PEMF has been reported to have an anti-inflammatory effect with increased healing and blood circulation, a research team decided to apply the technology to improve blood flow to the prostate and reduce the size of the gland.

The study used a Magcell® Vetri device from Physiomed Elektromedizin AG, Germany.

The study used a Magcell® Vetri device from Physiomed Elektromedizin AG, Germany

The research study involved 20 dogs with BPH. They received treatment with PEMF for 5 minutes, twice a day for three weeks. The device was simply held over the skin where the prostate is located.

The results were pretty amazing.   After 3 weeks, the average reduction of the prostate was 57%.   There was no interference with semen quality, testosterone levels or libido.   There was also a progressive reduction in resistance of blood flow in the dorsal branch of the prostatic artery, as seen with Doppler scanning.

Source:  Raffaella Leoci, Giulio Aiudi, Fabio Silvestre, Elaine Lissner, Giovanni Michele Lacalandra (2014). “Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on prostate volume and vascularity in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: A pilot study in a canine model.” The Prostate. June 9, 2014. (Available online)

 

Doggy quote of the month for June

“The only creatures that are evolved enough to convey pure love are dogs and infants.”

- Johnny Depp, actor

War Memorial pays tribute to animals that served in conflicts – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Soldiers with their dogs stand at the Australian War Memorial (photo by Siobhan Heanue, ABC)

Soldiers with their dogs stand at the Australian War Memorial (photo by Siobhan Heanue, ABC)

On the eve of Anzac Day, here’s a special story about service animals honoured recently at the Australiam War Memorial.

War Memorial pays tribute to animals that served in conflicts – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

Royal visit to New Zealand – the dog connection

Today was the last day in New Zealand for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (aka Will and Kate).  And finally, we have something dog-related from this visit!

The Duke and Duchess visited the Royal New Zealand Police College in Porirua this morning.  There, they met puppies, dogs in training, and fully-fledged police dogs.

William and Kate cuddle with police dog puppies (photo by Getty)

William and Kate cuddle with police dog puppies (photo by Getty)

A soft toy police dog was a gift to Kate, presumably for Prince George (photo by Getty)

A soft toy police dog was a gift to Kate, presumably for Prince George (photo by Getty)

And after this doggy (and soggy) visit, the Royals are now off to their next stop on the Royal Tour – Australia.   I hope Australia’s dogs will also be able to participate in their visit!

 

What is it about dogs and car advertising?

The folks at Land Rover are using a black Great Dane in their latest ad for the Range Rover Evoque:

What is it about using dogs in car advertising?  I think it is that most dogs enjoy car travel and being in the company of their family whether it is running the weekly errands or on a family vacation.

What do you think?

Read my earlier blogs on dogs and car advertising:

Olympian Hero Brings Home More Than a Medal

Well done to Olympic skier Gus Kenworthy for helping to save some of Sochi’s stray dogs.  Don’t forget to click through on the link in this article to the Today Show interview where Kenworthy and his friend talk about the challenges they faced in saving the dogs.

Olympian Hero Brings Home More Than a Medal.

Teaching wolves new tricks

The process of learning often involves mimicry or imitation.  In research published in the journal PLoS One, scientists from the Messerli Research Institute at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna report on their behaviour experiments involving wolves and dogs.

The results show that wolves observe one another more closely than dogs and so are better at learning from one another. 

Photo Credit: Walter Vorbeck

Photo Credit: Walter Vorbeck

The scientists found that wolves are considerably better than dogs at opening a container, providing they have previously watched another animal do so. Their study involved 14 wolves and 15 mongrel dogs, all about six months old, hand-reared and kept in packs.

Each animal was allowed to observe one of two situations in which a trained dog opened a wooden box, either with its mouth or with its paw, to gain access to a food reward. Surprisingly, all of the wolves managed to open the box after watching a dog solve the puzzle, while only four of the dogs managed to do so. Wolves more frequently opened the box using the method they had observed, whereas the dogs appeared to choose randomly whether to use their mouth or their paw.

The researchers think that it is likely that the dog-human cooperation originated from cooperation between wolves. During the process of domestication, dogs have become able to accept humans as social partners and thus have adapted their social skills to include interactions with them, concomitantly losing the ability to learn by watching other dogs.

Source:  University of Vienna media release

Caught on camera

Sometimes when the house goes really quiet, it pays to investigate.

This morning, I found Daisy in the kitchen rubbish bin….

Daisy eating out of the rubbish