Tag Archives: Pit Bull

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Wordless Wednesday, part 31

Honeybun

If a pit bull could talk

Pit bull poster

DoggyMom.com and Canine Catering do not support breed specific legislation in any form!

The facts about pit bulls

The facts about pit bullsSource:  National Geographic

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Wordless Wednesday, part 20

 

Pit bull tea partyBP_Wordless_wed_Hop_Logo_2014

Saving Cadence

Rescue groups often put photos and videos online to showcase key cases and the good work they do.  Every now and then, though, there will be a video that is particularly well done and with a success at the end.

As we reach the end of another week (yes, it’s Friday!)…here’s a story of a Pit Bull and her chance at a better life thanks to Hope for Paws:

The White House’s official position on breed specific legislation

Whoopee!  (or should I say ‘woof woof’).  This week the White House put out an official statement concerning its position on breed specific legislation.   And it’s great news…

“We don’t support breed-specific legislation — research shows that bans on certain types of dogs are largely ineffective and often a waste of public resources.

In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention looked at twenty years of data about dog bites and human fatalities in the United States. They found that fatal attacks represent a very small proportion of dog bite injuries to people and that it’s virtually impossible to calculate bite rates for specific breeds.

The CDC also noted that the types of people who look to exploit dogs aren’t deterred by breed regulations — when their communities establish a ban, these people just seek out new, unregulated breeds. And the simple fact is that dogs of any breed can become dangerous when they’re intentionally or unintentionally raised to be aggressive.

For all those reasons, the CDC officially recommends against breed-specific legislation — which they call inappropriate. You can read more from them here.

As an alternative to breed-specific policies, the CDC recommends a community-based approach to prevent dog bites. And ultimately, we think that’s a much more promising way to build stronger communities of pets and pet owners.”

Ginger Girl is one of the ex-fighting Pit Bulls saved from Michael Vick's Bad Newz Kennels and rehabilitated.  She lives in a loving home. Pit bulls are often the subject of breed specific legislation; yet they are very sweet dogs capable of much affection and devotion.

Ginger Girl is one of the ex-fighting Pit Bulls saved from Michael Vick’s Bad Newz Kennels and rehabilitated. She lives in a loving home.
Pit bulls are often the subject of breed specific legislation; yet they are very sweet dogs capable of much affection and devotion.

My temporary dogs

One of the great things about visiting and working at the Best Friends Animal Sanctuary is the range of dogs available for sleepovers.  Since I am on my final night of sleepovers, it is time to pay tribute to all four of my sleepover dogs…

Timothy, a one-year oldAmerican Staffordshire Terrier.  Beautiful boy with good manners.  I'm sorry we fed you so many treats in training class that we caused your diarrhea!

Timothy, a one-year old American Stafordshire Terrier. Beautiful boy with good manners. I’m sorry we fed you so many treats in training class that we caused your diarrhea!  Timothy’s underbite makes this wee boy adorable.

Chester, a Boxer cross (I think Boxer/Mastiff cross because of his wrinkles and large head size), age 7.  Chester is very bright and we practiced 'sit' during his stay.  A snuggly boy who snores!

Chester, a Boxer cross (I think Boxer/Mastiff cross because of his wrinkles and large head size), age 7. Chester is very bright and we practiced ‘sit’ during his stay. A snuggly boy who snores, I took Chester because he hadn’t been on a sleepover or outing for almost 2 months.

Madison, a young pit mix.  A fairly new arrival at Best Friends, she's not even on the website yet.  Really intelligent, and happily slept the night through.  Only drawback - she's a covers hog who enjoys the middle of the bed.

Madison, a young pit mix. A fairly new arrival at Best Friends, she’s not even on the website yet. Really intelligent, and happily slept the night through. Only drawback – she’s a covers hog who enjoys the middle of the bed.

Clover, another fairly new arrival and her photo isn't on the website yet.  A cattle dog mix, this young girl has good manners on leash and loves to disembowel toys.  A rubber chicken and a small squeaky sheep were victims during our evening together.

Clover, another fairly new arrival from Texas and her photo isn’t on the website yet. A cattle dog mix, this young girl has good manners on leash and loves to disembowel toys. A rubber chicken and a small squeaky sheep were victims during our evening together.  She also adores tummy rubs.

These dogs and many others can be viewed through the Best Friends website and so if you are thinking about adoption, this website is well worth a look.

Dog-friendly Las Vegas

The Riviera Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas is pet-friendly.  Through discount site Coupaw, it is currently offering a 3-day/2-night stay for 2 adults at the Riviera Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas for $30.  The voucher for this deal includes a Las Vegas BITE card which provides the cardholder with other excellent deals on a wide array of food and entertainment throughout Las Vegas.

Riviera Hotel

As with many pet-friendly hotels, there are restrictions including breed specific ones :(

The fine print says:

2 Dog maximum – $25 additional fee – per dog/per night. Pet fees are paid directly to the Riviera Hotel. All pet arrangements must be made directly with the Riviera Hotel. Pet friendly rooms are located in classic room types – San Remo tower. Dogs cannot exceed 50 lbs. Dog Owner must provide proof of current vaccinations including exhibiting current rabies tag on check in. Dogs that are excluded to stay in pet friendly rooms include but are not limited to: Akitas, Alaskan Malamutes, Chows, Doberman Pinschers, English Bull, Terriers, German Shepherds, Mastiffs, Pit Bulls, Presa, Canaries, Rottweiler, or any dog with a bite history. Coupaw is not responsible for the Riviera hotel refusing to accommodate specific dogs for any reason.

Putting your dog first

In one of my recent columns for the NZ Kennel Club, I wrote about making quality time for you and your dog.  It’s amazing to me as our Southern Hemisphere summer approaches that dog owners tell me they are having difficulty ‘finding the time’ for their dog.  Even with more daylight hours, the preparations for summer holidays and Christmas parties seem to take precedence.

The importance of putting your dog first was emphasised recently by American musician Fiona Apple.  She announced via her Facebook page in late November that she was postponing a tour of South America to stay at home with her elderly dog, Janet.  At 14, Janet (a rescued Pit Bull), is the priority in Ms Apple’s life.

I’m publishing her letter to fans here in its entirety because it expresses so clearly the importance of putting your dog first at key points in your life:

It’s 6 p.m. on Friday, and I’m writing to a few thousand friends I have not met yet. I am writing to ask them to change our plans and meet a little while later.

Here’s the thing.

I have a dog Janet, and she’s been ill for almost two years now, as a tumor has been idling in her chest, growing ever so slowly. She’s almost 14 years old now. I got her when she was 4 months old. I was 21 then, an adult officially — and she was my child.

She is a pitbull, and was found in Echo Park, with a rope around her neck, and bites all over her ears and face. She was the one the dogfighters use to puff up the confidence of the contenders. She’s almost 14 and I’ve never seen her start a fight, or bite, or even growl, so I can understand why they chose her for that awful role. She’s a pacifist.

Janet has been the most consistent relationship of my adult life, and that is just a fact. We’ve lived in numerous houses, and jumped a few make shift families, but it’s always really been the two of us. She slept in bed with me, her head on the pillow, and she accepted my hysterical, tearful face into her chest, with her paws around me, every time I was heartbroken, or spirit-broken, or just lost, and as years went by, she let me take the role of her child, as I fell asleep, with her chin resting above my head. She was under the piano when I wrote songs, barked any time I tried to record anything, and she was in the studio with me all the time we recorded the last album. The last time I came back from tour, she was spry as ever, and she’s used to me being gone for a few weeks every 6 or 7 years.

She has Addison’s Disease, which makes it dangerous for her to travel since she needs regular injections of Cortisol, because she reacts to stress and to excitement without the physiological tools which keep most of us from literally panicking to death. Despite all of this, she’s effortlessly joyful and playful, and only stopped acting like a puppy about 3 years ago. She’s my best friend and my mother and my daughter, my benefactor, and she’s the one who taught me what love is.

I can’t come to South America. Not now.

When I got back from the last leg of the US tour, there was a big, big difference. She doesn’t even want to go for walks anymore. I know that she’s not sad about aging or dying. Animals have a survival instinct, but a sense of mortality and vanity, they do not. That’s why they are so much more present than people.

But I know that she is coming close to point where she will stop being a dog, and instead, be part of everything. She’ll be in the wind, and in the soil, and the snow, and in me, wherever I go.

I just can’t leave her now, please understand. If I go away again, I’m afraid she’ll die and I won’t have the honor of singing her to sleep, of escorting her out.

Sometimes it takes me 20 minutes to pick which socks to wear to bed. But this decision is instant. These are the choices we make, which define us.

I will not be the woman who puts her career ahead of love and friendship. I am the woman who stays home and bakes Tilapia for my dearest, oldest friend. And helps her be comfortable, and comforted, and safe, and important. Many of us these days, we dread the death of a loved one. It is the ugly truth of Life, that keeps us feeling terrified and alone. I wish we could also appreciate the time that lies right beside the end of time. I know that I will feel the most overwhelming knowledge of her, and of her life and of my love for her, in the last moments. I need to do my damnedest to be there for that.

Because it will be the most beautiful, the most intense, the most enriching experience of life I’ve ever known. When she dies. So I am staying home, and I am listening to her snore and wheeze, and reveling in the swampiest, most awful breath that ever emanated from an angel.

And I am asking for your blessing.

A Hurricane Sandy survival story

There’s still a lot of work to be done in the communities hardest hit by Hurricane Sandy this week.  Thankfully, it seems that the lessons from Hurricane Katrina have helped and there will be fewer animal casualties because people evacuated with their pets (and shelters accepted them).

I thought I would share this story of Max, a mixed-breed believed to be Shepherd, Pointer and Pit Bull.

Jessie Streich-Kest pictured with Max in happier times. Photo courtesy of NYCCommunities

Max was found under a fallen tree on Tuesday alongside the bodies of his owner and her friend.  They were out walking together when the tree fell on them.  Max is now recovering from head injuries, a broken jaw and cuts.

Max’s owner, Jessie Streich-Kest, saved Max from an ASPCA shelter.  Now, when he recovers, he’ll go to live with her family.

Many charities like the Petfinder Foundation are using donations to help animals in need.  As temperatures drop in the region and power has yet to be restored, even shelters are finding it tough to keep their animals warm and comfortable.

It’s time to reach out and help where you can.