Tag Archives: animal shelters

How shelters can use the Pokemon Go craze to their advantage

I heard a business report recently that local shops can benefit from people using Pokemon Go by promoting themselves to people who are out and about playing the game.  For example, local cafes can offer specials for thirsty players to take a break.

And then the animal shelters got involved…

The animal shelter in Muncie, Indiana noticed that a lot of people were  walking around playing Pokemon Go.  Always in need of dog walkers, the shelter staff came up with the idea – play Pokemon and walk a shelter dog at the same time.

Pokemon Go poster

To take a Pokemon Dog, you have to sign a waiver form and you are reminded to watch where you are going for the sake of both you and the dog.

Walking is great exercise for dogs and humans.  If this Pokemon Go craze can help animals in shelters and rescues, I’m all for it.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

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Trial Results Promising for Curing Puppies’ Parvo

ABC News is reporting that a North Dakota company, Avianax, has treated about 50 puppies in seven states resulting in a 90 percent cure rate for canine parvovirus. Parvo spreads through animal waste and direct contact between dogs and is a major problem in animal shelters.  Read and listen to more below:

Trial Results Promising for Curing Puppies’ Parvo – ABC News.

Behavioural problems in pet store dogs

Dogs purchased from pet stores are more likely to have a range of behavior problems than those purchased from small, non-commercial breeders, says a study by researchers at the Best Friends Animal Society and the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.

The study was published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

The study involved 413 dogs purchased from pet stores.  Psychological and behavioral characteristics of these dogs were compared to the same characteristics in 5,657 dogs obtained from small-scale, private breeders.  (Most puppies sold in pet stores in the USA are sourced from large-scale, puppy mill type commercial breeders).

Results show that dogs obtained as puppies from pet stores showed significantly more aggression toward human family members, unfamiliar people and other dogs. Dogs purchased from pet stores were almost twice as likely to exhibit aggression directed toward unfamiliar dogs than dogs purchased from small non-commercial breeders.

The pet store dogs also a displayed greater fear of other dogs and typical events in pet dogs’ lives, had more behavior problems when left alone at home, and experienced more problems with house-soiling.  These behaviors in young adult dogs are reasons typically cited by people who surrender their pets to animal shelters.

“The results were so one-sided that in the wide range of behavior problems we included in our analysis, pet store dogs failed in every single case to even obtain one more favorable score than the comparison group of dogs” says Dr Frank McMillan of Best Friends Animal Society.

The research team acknowledges that the exact causes of the behavioral problems observed are not known; until these causes are understood, they recommend avoiding purchasing puppies from pet stores.

Source:  BusinessWire media release

See my related post about the ASPCA’s No Pet Store Puppies initiative

 

 

 

Moving Animals Places

MAP map

Moving Animals Places, or MAP,  is an interactive, web-based application to help address oversupply and demand challenges for animal shelters across the U.S.

Hosted by the ASPCA, the system allows shelters to contact each other and work out how to move animals places where they are more likely to find homes.

Membership is free and the data stream is in real-time so shelters are guaranteed to receive the latest information.

This is just one initiative to help relocate animals from overcrowded shelters and those with a higher euthanasia rate to those with space and capacity for adoption.

Does your shelter belong to the MAP system?  If not, it may be worth a look!

No-Kill Los Angeles (NKLA)

Last month, a very special initiative was launched in Los Angeles – NKLA (No-Kill Los Angeles)

This initiative is another to help achieve the goal of the Best Friends Animal Society: No More Homeless Pets. 

NKLA’s website says “We are a coalition of animal welfare organizations, city shelters and passionate individuals. Led by Best Friends Animal Society, we’re dedicated to ending the killing of healthy and treatable pets in L.A. shelters. Our plan is straightforward. Provide spay/neuter services where they are needed most so fewer animals go into shelters, and increase adoptions through the combined efforts of the NKLA coalition so more animals come out of the shelters and go into new homes.”

In 2011, over 17,000  adoptable animals were euthanised in the Los Angeles area – so the need is great.

If you live in the Los Angeles area and are an animal lover, perhaps you should consider assisting the NKLA movement by donating money, fostering, or adopting.