Tag Archives: Boxer

Wiggles gets his wiggle on

Wiggles, an aging Boxer, is a new admission to Best Friends Animal Sanctuary.  We didn’t know why he was surrendered, but we noticed during our assessment that he had signs of arthritis including some lameness in his left foreleg.  Wiggles would also benefit from weight loss.

Our job was to do some initial training with Wiggles, who proved to be a clever (as well as cute) boy.  I particularly found his under bite adorable.

Wiggles

Wiggles

And before I tell you more…here’s why Wiggles’ name is appropriate:

Working on 'sit'

Working on ‘sit’

Success!

Success!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

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So ugly, they’re cute

The World’s Ugliest Dog Contest has been held annually in Petaluma, California as part of the Sonoma-Marin Fair for 25 years.   This contest has grown in popularity and is now featured on cable television channel Animal Planet.

Although dog moms and dads who enter their dog mainly come from the United States, anyone can enter.  The Chinese Crested, a largely hairless breed, has figured prominently amongst the winners.

This year (2013), the title was awarded to Walle, a beagle, boxer, basset hound mix with a large head and a duck-footed walk.  He beat 29 other contestants for the title.

Walle, the World's Ugliest Dog 2013

Walle, the World’s Ugliest Dog 2013

Vicki DeArmon has written a book about the contest which profiles winners, other entrants, and their owners.  The pictures really do prove that some creatures are so ugly that they’re cute.
World's Ugliest Dog Book

Maybe the dog lover in your pack would like this book for Christmas, or perhaps you should treat yourself?

November is Adopt a Senior Pet Month

And to mark this occasion, I share with you a new video of Thelma and Louise with their new owners.

I wrote about Thelma and Louise back in September, and this video interviews their new owners.

If you are thinking of adding a dog to your pack, please think about a rescue dog and contact your local shelters to see the range of great dogs available.

Deaf pet awareness week

The week of 23 – 29 September is Deaf Pet Awareness Week.

In many cases, when a dog is found to be deaf, it is put to sleep.   However, more frequently there are pet owners willing to take on these special needs animals.  These dogs can be trained using sign language and are just as intelligent as ‘normal’ dogs.

Deafness in animals can be inherited or acquired through trauma, drug reactions, or simply old age.   Dalmatians and Boxers are more prone to deafness than others. Thirty percent of all Dalmatians born are either deaf in one ear or  bilaterally deaf.   Some deaf dogs also have albinism, meaning that they lack normal melanin pigment in their eyes, nose, or skin.  Owners of these dogs have to pay special attention to sun protection.

The Deaf Dog Education Action Fund has a wonderful website with answers to questions involving the ownership and care of deaf dogs.

Use this special week to contact animal shelters in your area to find out if there is a special deaf dog waiting for you!

Aggressive dog? How agreeable is the owner?

Research from the University of Leicester’s School of Psychology  has revealed that young people who are more disagreeable are likely to own an aggressive dog.

‘Agreeableness’ means being less concerned with the needs or well-being of others.  Such people may be suspicious, unfriendly and competitive as well.

Participants were given personality tests and  indicated their preference for different types of dogs  . The dogs were independently rated according to how aggressive people perceived them to be. Bull terriers were rated as most aggressive, followed by boxers; retrievers and cocker spaniels were seen as least aggressive.

The study’s results also show a small effect suggesting that those who liked aggressive dogs showed signs of conscientiousness – being careful, reliable and thoughtful about their actions.

Whilst this finding (about conscientiousness) contradicts a long-held perception that owners of aggressive dogs are always irresponsible, Dr Vincent Egan, the study’s lead researcher suggests caution before reading too much into the conclusion:

“These results with Conscientiousness were unexpected, but the effect is a small one, and needs to be repeated in a different group of people. Studies of this kind tend to only look at a restricted age ranges, which may exaggerate findings which do not occur across the entire lifespan, so we believe a stereotype is always true, whereas it may only be true under certain conditions. Our study employed a broader age range.”

Dr Egan’s study has been published in the journal Anthrozoos.

Would a raised dog feeder help my dog?

A massage client asked me this question earlier this week.   The dog in question is a Boxer (beautiful boy) who happens to be suffering from degeneration in his spine.

Although he is doing well with regular swimming, acupuncture and massage therapy, his owner knows that he is comparatively young (8) and she wants him to have a good quality of life for a long time.  So that’s when we started talking about changes she could make to his physical environment to make things less stressful for him (ramps, steps, etc.)

Would a raised feeder help my dog?

Raised feeders can be a real advantage for a dog with orthopaedic problems or arthritis.  Eating from a raised feeder helps to relieve strain on the neck and back, allowing the dog to eat without dramatically altering their posture and helping them to retain balance.

But – some studies have shown that dogs who are susceptible to bloat have an increased risk from eating from a raised feeder.  The most notable reference for this link is an article by Dr Larry Glickman in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 17, No. 10.

Gastric dilation-volvulus (GDV) is known by the common term ‘bloat’  and other terms such as ‘stomach torsion’ or ‘twisted stomach.’  Regardless of what name you use, the condition is life-threatening.  Dogs can die of bloat within several hours.   Even with treatment, as many as 25-33% of dogs who develop bloat will die.

In bloat, the stomach fills up with air and puts pressure on the other organs and the diaphragm. The pressure on the diaphragm makes it difficult for the dog to breathe. The air-filled stomach also compresses large veins in the abdomen, preventing blood from returning to the heart.

Filled with air, the stomach can easily rotate on itself, pinching off its blood supply. This rotation is known as volvulus.  The stomach begins to die and the entire blood supply is disrupted.  A dog with this condition can deteriorate very rapidly – meaning a trip to the vet as an emergency.

Purdue University ranks Boxers as the 16th breed most susceptible to bloat (Great Danes are the highest).  So, in this case, the owner decided not to opt for a raised feeder.  Not only is her Boxer on the higher risk list, but he also is a gobbler – making quick work of his food!

This is just one example where it pays to do a little research.  An idea that seems like a good one may not be so.