Tag Archives: bull terrier

Jimmy the Bull

On artist’s Rafael Mantesso’s thirtieth birthday, his wife left him.

She took their cookware, their furniture, their photos.  But she left Rafael with Jimmy, their bull terrier who she had named after shoe designer Jimmy Choo.

With only Jimmy for company in an apartment painted white, Rafael found inspiration in his blank walls and his best friend and started snapping photos of Jimmy Choo.  Then, when Jimmy collapsed in happy exhaustion next to the white wall, on a whim Rafael grabbed a marker and drew a new world around his pup.

Jimmy with champagne

And this began a collaboration of the artist and his bull terrier which gained fame through social media – even attracting the attention of the Jimmy Choo brand.  In May 2015, they launched a limited edition line of accessories featuring Jimmy the Bull.

Jimmy Stop Wars

And a book of Mantesso’s drawings, A Dog Named Jimmy is also available.  In November 2015, it made the New York Times bestseller list.

A Dog named Jimmy

I love bullies and clearly many other people do, too.  Jimmy even has a 2016 calendar featuring his image.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Wordless Wednesday, part 54

Tilly helps her Mum do the gardening  Photo by Denise Balloch

Tilly, an English Bull Terrier, helps her Mum do the gardening (Photo by Denise Balloch)

 

Dogs in strollers: real men do it!

I’m so happy to be able to share these photos.

Kenny is a Blue Heeler/Bull Terrier cross.  Now 12, he’s survived a car accident when a puppy and then a stroke in 2011.

Not surprisingly, Kenny has a few mobility issues.  His back gets sore and his left side is weaker.   He gets regular massage and laser treatments from me which help to keep him more comfortable and mobile.

Like many other senior dogs with a few aches and pains, Kenny still wants to join his family when they go out.  Sometimes he makes it into his favourite park but then struggles on the way back to the car.

The solution, when Kenny gets tired, is to put him in a stroller.

Kenny with dad, Jason (photo by Elesha Ennis)

Kenny with dad, Jason (photo by Elesha Ennis)

Many men seem reluctant to be seen walking their dog in a stroller.  I say “Real men are happy to show that they care and love their dog”.  All credit to Jason, Kenny’s dogfather.

Dogs with mobility issues can live full and active lives with a little help.  Kenny is far better off getting the mental stimulation of family outings than he is being left at home.  Senior dog care requires management techniques; strollers and carts can play their part.

It's a long way back to the car...thanks Dad!  (Photo courtesy of Elesha Ennis)

It’s a long way back to the car…thanks Dad! (Photo courtesy of Elesha Ennis)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Bullseye! The mascot of the Target Corporation

The value of dogs in advertising cannot be underestimated.  Just ask the Target Corporation, a chain of discount stores in the United States.

Their mascot is Bullseye, a bull terrier.

Photo by Target Corporation

Photo by Target Corporation

Bullseye features in print media and television campaigns and appears ‘in person’ at corporate events including store openings.  In October 2014, for example, Target opened a CityTarget store in Boston, not far from famed Fenway Park.

To mark the occasion, the company did photo shoots of Bullseye at various famous locations around the city.  Now that’s public relations!

Bullseye apparently lives on a ranch just north of Los Angeles with her trainers.  Over the years, there have been many Bullseyes (just like there were successive Lassies over the years).  The company has also proudly reported that the makeup used on Bullseye is non-toxic and natural.

Bulleye is so popular that Target offers a range of products featuring Bullseye in its Bullseye Shop.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Lucy and Remi: 2 great dog stories in 2 days

From the New Zealand papers this week…Lucy the dog helps save her owner when she falls down a cliff and Remi, a naughty Bull Terrier, alerts his owner to help save a trapped motorist.

Read the links – great stories!

Nikita McMurtrie and her dog, Lucy (Photo by Mytchall Bransgrove)

Nikita McMurtrie and her dog, Lucy (Photo by Mytchall Bransgrove)

Loyal Lucy alerts mum – national | Stuff.co.nz

Angel Marsh with Remi; credited with saving a man trapped in a wrecked car (Photo by Fairfax NZ)

Angel Marsh with Remi; credited with saving a man trapped in a wrecked car (Photo by Fairfax NZ)

Dog helps owner to find crash victim – national | Stuff.co.nz

Wordless Wednesday, part 33

"Who loves who the most" Photo by Robert Balloch

“Who loves who the most” Photo by Robert Balloch

BP_Wordless_wed_Hop_Logo_2014

My temporary dogs

One of the great things about visiting and working at the Best Friends Animal Sanctuary is the range of dogs available for sleepovers.  Since I am on my final night of sleepovers, it is time to pay tribute to all four of my sleepover dogs…

Timothy, a one-year oldAmerican Staffordshire Terrier.  Beautiful boy with good manners.  I'm sorry we fed you so many treats in training class that we caused your diarrhea!

Timothy, a one-year old American Stafordshire Terrier. Beautiful boy with good manners. I’m sorry we fed you so many treats in training class that we caused your diarrhea!  Timothy’s underbite makes this wee boy adorable.

Chester, a Boxer cross (I think Boxer/Mastiff cross because of his wrinkles and large head size), age 7.  Chester is very bright and we practiced 'sit' during his stay.  A snuggly boy who snores!

Chester, a Boxer cross (I think Boxer/Mastiff cross because of his wrinkles and large head size), age 7. Chester is very bright and we practiced ‘sit’ during his stay. A snuggly boy who snores, I took Chester because he hadn’t been on a sleepover or outing for almost 2 months.

Madison, a young pit mix.  A fairly new arrival at Best Friends, she's not even on the website yet.  Really intelligent, and happily slept the night through.  Only drawback - she's a covers hog who enjoys the middle of the bed.

Madison, a young pit mix. A fairly new arrival at Best Friends, she’s not even on the website yet. Really intelligent, and happily slept the night through. Only drawback – she’s a covers hog who enjoys the middle of the bed.

Clover, another fairly new arrival and her photo isn't on the website yet.  A cattle dog mix, this young girl has good manners on leash and loves to disembowel toys.  A rubber chicken and a small squeaky sheep were victims during our evening together.

Clover, another fairly new arrival from Texas and her photo isn’t on the website yet. A cattle dog mix, this young girl has good manners on leash and loves to disembowel toys. A rubber chicken and a small squeaky sheep were victims during our evening together.  She also adores tummy rubs.

These dogs and many others can be viewed through the Best Friends website and so if you are thinking about adoption, this website is well worth a look.

Tail chasing – an obsessive compulsive disorder?

The genetics research group at the University of Helsinki has published its findings into a study of tail chasing in dogs.  The study involved 400 dogs and questionnaires to the owners about their dog’s behaviour.  Samples of each dog’s blood were also taken.

The questionnaires covered behaviours, aspects of the dog’s puppyhood and daily routines.  Owners were also asked to evaluate their dog’s personality.

Compulsive tail chasing can occur in any dog but is common in breeds such as the Bull Terrier and German Shepherd.  These breeds were included in the research, as were the Miniature Bull Terrier and the Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

The study aimed to describe the characteristics of tail chasing in dogs and to ascertain the environmental risk factors for the disorder.  The researchers also wanted to know if a previously identified gene that has been associated with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)  had a role to play.

What they found

  • The OCD gene that had been linked to other compulsive disorders in dogs was not associated with the tail chasing disorder
  • Dogs responded with less tail chasing when fed supplements of vitamins and minerals, although the researchers feel that more study is warranted to prove this link
  • Early separation from their mothers and/or poor care from their mother also predisposed dogs to compulsive tail chasing

Dogs may be a good model for studying OCD in humans because they are physiologically similar and share our environment.  Consequently, this research has wider implications.

The research paper is available in the 27 July 2012 edition of PloS ONE

Source:  University of Helsinki press release

Kathleen Crisley, Fear-Free certified professional and specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Aggressive dog? How agreeable is the owner?

Research from the University of Leicester’s School of Psychology  has revealed that young people who are more disagreeable are likely to own an aggressive dog.

‘Agreeableness’ means being less concerned with the needs or well-being of others.  Such people may be suspicious, unfriendly and competitive as well.

Participants were given personality tests and  indicated their preference for different types of dogs  . The dogs were independently rated according to how aggressive people perceived them to be. Bull terriers were rated as most aggressive, followed by boxers; retrievers and cocker spaniels were seen as least aggressive.

The study’s results also show a small effect suggesting that those who liked aggressive dogs showed signs of conscientiousness – being careful, reliable and thoughtful about their actions.

Whilst this finding (about conscientiousness) contradicts a long-held perception that owners of aggressive dogs are always irresponsible, Dr Vincent Egan, the study’s lead researcher suggests caution before reading too much into the conclusion:

“These results with Conscientiousness were unexpected, but the effect is a small one, and needs to be repeated in a different group of people. Studies of this kind tend to only look at a restricted age ranges, which may exaggerate findings which do not occur across the entire lifespan, so we believe a stereotype is always true, whereas it may only be true under certain conditions. Our study employed a broader age range.”

Dr Egan’s study has been published in the journal Anthrozoos.