Tag Archives: Dr Nick Trout

Love is the Best Medicine – book review

This is the third book by Dr Nick Trout that I’ve read.  In it, Dr Trout weaves a tale based on two actual clients and their dogs who inspired him to consider his role in healing.

The book carries the appropriate subtitle ‘What two dogs taught one veterinarian about hope, humility and everyday miracles’

Love is the best medicine

In this book we watch the stories of Cleo, a Miniature Pinscher and Helen, a Cocker Spaniel, unfold.  The dogs and their owners don’t know each other, but their stories intertwine because of Dr Trout’s involvement with both dogs.

It’s never easy when we find out that our dog is seriously unwell, and we all want to believe in miracles to keep them with us for a little while longer.  This theme of love for your dog will resonate with most dog parents.

I didn’t like this book as well as Tell me where it hurts, Dr Trout’s other autobiographical story.  It was, nonetheless, a good read.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

For other book reviews:

I’ve previously reviewed The Patron Saint of Lost Dogs, a novel by Dr Trout.  Read it here.

 

The Patron Saint of Lost Dogs – book review

Patron saint of lost dogs

In this first novel by Dr Nick Trout, the main character – Dr Cyrus Mills – returns to his hometown to run the veterinary practice of his late father.  Already in financial difficulties himself, Cyrus finds the the practice is also in dire straights and the local banker has given him a week to come up with a good faith payment on debt.

On his first day in the practice, he meets a Golden Retriever named Frieda whose owner wants her to be put down because she is having accidents in the house.  Frieda becomes something of a stowaway in Cyrus’ apartment as “Missing Dog” posters start appearing around the town featuring Frieda, whose full name is Frieda Fuzzypaws.

Then there are the other characters that make up the story.  The x-ray of a Persian cat with digestive problems reveals that the owner’s fiancee isn’t as doting and devoted as he seems.  An elderly female dog named Clint (one in a long line) tests Cyrus’ ability to work with emotional owners and brings him closer to his own love interest, a local waitress.

Clearly Dr Trout has used his own veterinary background to make this story realistic and, hailing from New England himself, he’s used a small Vermont town in winter as the setting for the story.

I enjoyed this novel.  I wouldn’t say I loved it – but it’s a good one for taking on vacation with you to the beach.

And you have to find out what happens to Frieda Fuzzypaws!

I’ve also reviewed Tell Me Where It Hurts by Dr Trout.  Read my review here.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

Tell me where it hurts

Tell me where it hurts
I have thoroughly enjoyed reading Tell Me Where It Hurts by Dr Nick Trout.  Appropriately subtitled “A Day of Humor, Healing and Hope in My Life as an Animal Surgeon,”  this book tells the story of one very long day in Dr Trout’s professional life.  As the day unfolds, a range of human-animal stories are revealed with wit and compassion.

The book opens in the wee hours of the morning with the story of Sage,  a German Shepherd who requires emergency surgery on her stomach.  We later meet her devoted elderly owner whose daughter isn’t so impressed with Dr Trout’s efforts to save ‘just a dog.’

There’s also the owner of Belle who, as a demonstration of how much the dog means to him, has legally changed his middle name to Belle.  (You read that right, a man with the middle name of Belle.)

This book reads a little like the veterinary version of ER, since the Angell Memorial Animal Center where Trout works is a teaching hospital.  If you liked the television show ER and you love animals, you’ll like this book.

Appropriately, the cover of the book features a Boston Terrier.  The Angell Memorial Animal Center is located in Boston.