Tag Archives: family

Survey Finds Over Half of Dog Owners Kiss Their Pooches More Than Their Partners

If I am totally honest, I like this kind of simple research at times!

– DoggyMom.com


kissing-dog

Photo: Getty

Pucker up, pup!

Riley’s Organics, an organic dog treat company, recently conducted a survey to see just how close pet parents are to their dogs.

The company asked dog owners across the U.S. how much TLC they give their canines, and found that dogs often get more love than humans.

According to Riley’s results, 52% of respondents admitted to kissing their dog more than their partner. This trend continued into the respondents’ sleep habits. Out of those surveyed, 52% said they prefer to sleep in bed with their dog over their partner.

These numbers, while likely surprising to some who don’t own pets, make more sense when you learn that 94% of pet parents surveyed by Riley’s said they consider their dog to be one of their best friends.

Significant others can’t compete with the overwhelming love of a true blue BFF.

Source:  People.com

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A thought for Monday

Dogs and family

Palliative care for dogs

In humans, palliative care is provided to patients to help relieve symptoms of chronic or serious illnesses, such as Alzheimer’s disease or cancer.  This type of treatment includes pain relief but also stress relief to enhance quality of life.

Palliative care is also available for dogs and is a viable alternative to immediate euthanasia when the vet and the family feel that the dog still has quality of life and any pain can be managed.

As a canine massage and rehab practitioner, I get involved in palliative care cases.  Some dogs are at the palliative care phase when I am called in.  Others have been my clients for a while and their life situation has changed.  Using acupressure, massage and/or low level laser, I’m able to help with pain management and give the dog a bit of TLC.  I often play relaxing music for the dog to make the time even more special.

In my experience, palliative care can be a very positive, transitional phase for the family.  It’s a time to say goodbye. If there are children in the household, parents are able to explain what will happen when a dog is put to sleep and the children learn to understand the vulnerabilities of a dog who is old or who is ill.

It will never be easy to say goodbye, but thanks to quality veterinary care and a greater understanding of pain management, more owners can opt for a palliative care phase for their dog – so they can enjoy as much time together as possible.