Tag Archives: Snoopy

Doggy quote of the month for December

My own dog gone commercial

“My own dog…gone commercial. I can’t stand it!”

–  Charlie Brown, owner/guardian of Snoopy

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The Peanuts Movie

Opening next month, Snoopy is coming to the big screen!

I like the look of the animations in this trailer; Snoopy and Woodstock look like the cartoons that I remember which were originally drawn by the late Charles M Schulz.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

World Stray Animals Day

Today – Friday, 4th April 2014 World Stray Animals Day.

If you want your life to be better with a dog…please visit your local adoption center.  (Remember, even Snoopy was adopted!)

Life is better with a dog

The Daisy Hill Puppy Farm

Daisy (my Daisy) is (not surprisingly) a fan of Snoopy because he was born at the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm.  (I’ve tried to explain that the Farm was named long before Daisy was born, but she doesn’t quite grasp that concept.)

Mr Schultz, creator of Peanuts, clearly didn’t know about puppy mills when he was creating the story of Snoopy’s adoption – because the Farm looks nothing like the puppy mill operations we see today.  Snoopy was able to be raised with his mother and siblings in a ‘free range’ environment which included a healthy buffet for dinner and musical interludes…

This YouTube video shows what the Daisy Hill Puppy Farm looked like:

Wouldn’t it be wonderful if all puppies were raised in these conditions?

Kissing your dog and the link to gum disease

My mother was never happy when our dog got too close and  managed to lick her on the mouth.   In the Snoopy cartoons, you might remember when Lucy would run around yelling ‘Get the iodine, get the hot water.  I’ve been kissed by a dog.’ 

It turns out that there is need for caution when considering the mouth-to-mouth contact with your dog.

Researchers from Japan have tracked a microbe that is very common in dogs but rare in humans.   In dog owners, 16% of them had the microbe and it appears that they share close contact with their dogs – including kissing.

The researchers also found ten human strains of periodontitis-related bacteria in the dogs’ mouths.  And they found that low levels of contact were enough to transmit mouth bacteria either way.

In considering the research, Dr Paul Maza, of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University, told America’s Fox News:  ‘Many of the different types of bacteria in dogs and cats are the same type of bacteria as in humans. If owners practice oral hygiene on their pets, such as  brushing their teeth, a pet’s mouth can actually be even cleaner than a human mouth.’

Read the full story in the Daily Mail.

The Beagle

Since I have Beagles in my massage practice, I thought it would be useful to profile this medium-sized breed.

Teddy

Beagles regularly feature on the most popular breed list in the United States.    Using American Kennel Club registrations from 2011, the Beagle is the third most popular dog.

The Beagle originated in the United Kingdom where they were used as hunting dogs for rabbits and other prey animals because of their keen sense of smell and ability to track.  As a pet, owners have to watch their Beagle because he/she will easily follow its nose to track interesting smells – potentially wandering far from home.

Beagles are classified as being tri-colour (black, white and tan) or lemon (yellow) and sometimes even red or white.  An average life span is 15 years.

This breed is prone to hip dysplasia, intervertebral disc disease, and allergies.  Some develop seizure disorders and hypothyroidism.  Regular ear cleaning is recommended because their long, floppy ears (which are very appealing) help to create an ideal environment to hold moisture and bacteria in the ear canal.

The Beagle is a hound and can be extremely vocal, so good training is needed.  Beagles are also known for their appetites and so to keep the weight off, a balanced and healthy diet is needed with careful attention paid to how much the dog is eating during the day (treats, ‘finds’ on walks, etc.)  Plenty of exercise is also needed.

Owners of Beagles tell me that since they were bred as pack dogs (for hunting), they don’t do well as a solo dog in a household.  They need companionship and can become depressed if left alone for long periods of time.  (This depression can lead to problem barking problems, too.)

Beagles are often spotted at airports, cruise ship terminals and postal depots because they are widely used as agriculture and drug detector dogs.  That’s because they can be trained to put their keen noses to good use!  I even came across this YouTube clip from the television show The Doctors where Beagles and Dachshunds are being used as detector dogs for bed bug infestations:

Sadly, because of their size and temperament, they are often used in laboratories for animal testing.  In November 2011, I covered a story about 40 laboratory Beagles who had been rescued.

Perhaps the most famous Beagle is Snoopy (the cartoon by Charles Schulz).  Snoopy was obviously a white Beagle.

If you are looking for a lively pet with minimal grooming requirements and generally a good temperament, then the Beagle may be right for you!