Tag Archives: workplace health

Is a pets-at-work policy wellness’ new best friend?

The challenges for managers these days include ’employee satisfaction’  ‘reduce stress’ ’employee retention’ ‘increase productivity’ and ‘how can we get people to work longer hours?’

In this article by BenefitsPro (a resource for HR managers), you’ll discover the 2012 study which showed that employees whose dog accompanied them to work actually had lower stress at the end of the day compared to the start (the opposite was true for employees who were not accompanied by their pet).

Risdall Public Relations employee Len Mitsch takes advantage of the firm's pet-at-work policy with his dog, Rowdy. Photo courtesy of Risdall Public Relations

Risdall Public Relations employee Len Mitsch takes advantage of the firm’s pet-at-work policy with his dog, Rowdy. Photo courtesy of Risdall Public Relations

“Pet presence may serve as a low-cost, wellness intervention readily available to many organizations,” says Randolph Barker, professor of management in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Business

For the full story, click the link below:

Is a pets-at-work policy wellness’ new best friend? | BenefitsPro.

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Benefits of taking Fido to work may not be far ‘fetched’

The  benefits of dogs in the workplace are the subject of new research published in the March issue of the International Journal of Workplace Health Management.

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University  found that the presence of dogs in the workplace may buffer the impact of stress during the work day in both their owners and the people that they come into contact with.

In this YouTube video, principal investigator Dr Randolph T Barker (no pun intended) talks about the costs of stress to employers through lost work time and the benefits of increased productivity.

The researchers conducted their study at Replacements Ltd, the pet-friendly workplace that I featured here in March 2011.

Although Dr Barker is a Professor of Management, he collaborated with specialists in psychiatry and biostatistics for this study.  The researchers emphasise that their results are preliminary and that the next step is to expand the study to a larger sample size in an organisational setting.

I wonder which firm will put their hand up for that study?