Tag Archives: YouTube

YouTube videos help researchers study dog bites

dog-biting

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have turned to the popular video-sharing site YouTube to study the complex issue of dog bites.

Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. However, it remains difficult for researchers to understand the circumstances leading up to dog bites, with most studies relying on evidence collected after bites happen, such as hospital records and victim interviews.

In a new study published in Scientific Reports researchers have, for the first time, used YouTube videos to directly observe and analyse dog bites in situ.

Lead author Sara Owczarczak-Garstecka said: “Online videos present us with an unexplored opportunity to observe dog bites first-hand, something which is just not possible using other methods. Making more use of this type of shared content for research could help us better understand how and why bites occur and contribute to the development of bite prevention strategies.”

Using search terms such as ‘dog bite’ and ‘dog attack’ the researchers sampled 143 videos that were uploaded to YouTube between January 2016 and March 2017. For each video the context of bites, bite severity, victim and dog characteristics were recorded. For 56 of these videos they were also able to analyse the details of human and dog behaviour leading up to the bite.

The researchers acknowledge that YouTube videos of dog bites are likely subject to some bias, with, for example, bites by small dogs perhaps perceived as ‘comical’ and therefore more likely to be uploaded online.

The findings reveal that despite this potential bias, the demographic characteristics of the victims and dogs seen in YouTube bite videos, such as breed type and victims’ sex and age, are consistent with those found in previous studies. Common dog breeds observed included Chihuahuas, German Shepherds, Pit bulls and Labrador Retrievers. Around 7 in 10 of the bite victims in the videos were male, while more than half of bites observed were to children and infants.

Although this small study did not allow an exploration of the causal relationship between human behaviour and dog bites, some behaviours that have been previously observed within the context of dog bites were observed here to precede a bite. For example, the researchers observed that tactile contact with a dog increased approximately 20 seconds before a bite, as did standing or leaning over a dog.

Sara Owczarczak-Garstecka added: “These findings could offer some valuable new insight for the development of bite prevention strategies. Prevention messages could emphasise the risk of leaning over a dog and simply advise avoiding contact with a dog when possible or in doubt.”

Future research plans to better understand people’s behaviour around dogs and their perceptions of dog bites include a series of interviews with dog owners, people who work around dogs and bite recipients.

The paper ‘Online videos indicate human and dog behaviour preceding dog bites and the context in which bites occur’ is published in Scientific Reports [doi:10.1038/s41598-018-25671-7]

Source:  University of Liverpool media release

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Francis of Cooking with Dog

I’m still learning about all the content I can watch on YouTube.  I have only recently found the Cooking with Dog series – which features an unnamed Japanese female chef  (only referred to as Chef) and Francis,  a Poodle.  The series started filming in 2009 with a new video listed every Friday.

Francis narrates each video in English (with a Japanese accent), while Chef speaks in Japanese.

Sadly, Francis the Poodle passed away in November 2016 at the advanced age of 14 years, 9 months.  In one of the last of the videos, we are told that Francis was feeling unwell and so his stand-ins are some soft toy Poodles.  And then there is a message on the final videos telling us they were filmed before his passing.

What a novel idea – a Poodle narrating a Japanese cooking program!  I only wish I had found Francis and Chef sooner.

Rest easy, Francis.  And thanks for your cooking legacy!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

The Golden Retriever obedience fail

This video is a couple of years old; but to me it shows the best in owners who compete in events like obedience and agility.

In this obedience test, the dogs run a gauntlet of diversions including treats and toys.  Their goal is to focus on their handler and reach the end – quickly.

You will see that the first two dogs manage this test fairly successfully.  And then it is the Golden Retriever’s turn…

What I like is that the owner doesn’t yell or visually get upset or angry. She encourages her dog to reach the end of the competition.

And then everyone celebrates!

It breaks my heart to attend competitive events when the owners/handlers are angry or upset with their dogs when they don’t perform.  Dogs, like us, have bad days.  I have even met owners who say they know their dog doesn’t like competitions, but he/she does it because that’s what the owner wants.

My recommendation is that you and your dog take part in things that give you joy – and in this Golden Retriever’s case – he clearly shows he’s enjoying life and having fun.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

Barley is more than a pet

These are the introductory words to this video, another excellent one sponsored by the Kleenex brand.

Andi is a little girl with Down’s Syndrome and Barley is her assistance dog who has been trained by Canine Companions for Independence.

I love to share stories about assistance dogs like Barley.  No wonder this video has been called “A Girl’s Best Friend”

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

White Knuckles – a video using rescue dogs

In this video, the band OK Go is featured with 14 rescue dogs.   The dogs were trained by firm Talented Animals.

On YouTube, you’ll also find videos of the production and behind-the-scenes takes.

Creative and entertaining!

How dogs see with their noses

This post isn’t some reference to a scientific journal – it’s a YouTube video.

I hope you enjoy it and learn a little something about your dog’s gift of smell…

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Unlikely Best Friends

I’m always a little surprised when, after I explain that one of my services is to help owners measure and fit dogs for mobility carts, that I get answers like “I’d never do that to a dog.”

Stories like this one, an ad sponsored by the Kleenex brand, show you why some dogs can do very well in a cart – and experience quality of life while also sharing unconditional love.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand