Tag Archives: poodle

Francis of Cooking with Dog

I’m still learning about all the content I can watch on YouTube.  I have only recently found the Cooking with Dog series – which features an unnamed Japanese female chef  (only referred to as Chef) and Francis,  a Poodle.  The series started filming in 2009 with a new video listed every Friday.

Francis narrates each video in English (with a Japanese accent), while Chef speaks in Japanese.

Sadly, Francis the Poodle passed away in November 2016 at the advanced age of 14 years, 9 months.  In one of the last of the videos, we are told that Francis was feeling unwell and so his stand-ins are some soft toy Poodles.  And then there is a message on the final videos telling us they were filmed before his passing.

What a novel idea – a Poodle narrating a Japanese cooking program!  I only wish I had found Francis and Chef sooner.

Rest easy, Francis.  And thanks for your cooking legacy!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

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Roam by Alan Lazar

RoamThis novel, Alan Lazar’s first, is a must-read.  Roam is the story of Nelson, a Beagle/Poodle cross who enjoys and experiences his world through his sense of smell.

Mr Lazar does an excellent job at describing Nelson’s story from Nelson’s point of view; for example: ‘The first thing Nelson smelled was grass…The smell had many layers to it.”

Nelson’s cross-bred litter was an accident to an elderly breeder who would sell poodles and beagle pups for extra income.  Nelson is sent to a Boston pet store to be sold and he experiences his first ‘bad’ person – the store owner who resents having to sell a cross-bred pup.

And then Katey, a pianist, enters his life.  Katey becomes Nelson’s Great Love and for a time, they enjoy a happy life together with a routine that includes daily piano practice, with Nelson sitting contentedly under the piano.  “Here Comes the Sun” becomes a special song for Nelson.  Nelson particularly enjoys the flowers in the garden:  “His favorite of all was the beautiful white tuberoses that Katey had planted a few months earlier.  Their scent was pretty during the day, but Nelson particularly loved inhaling them at night, when their true, mystical fragrance emerged.”

Then, as Katey’s marriage is in trouble, a gate is left open one day and Nelson follows his nose.   He roams far from home, living on the streets where a homeless man quickly steals his prized collar to sell for a dollar.  Since Nelson is not micro-chipped, he loses his only means of identification.

Roam tells the story of Nelson’s eight years on the run.  We meet his truck driving companion, Thatcher; his girlfriend, Lucy; a wolf family; and other characters.  Nelson, as a stray dog, narrowly escapes being euthanized in an animal shelter on two occasions.  And he loses his leg to a vehicular accident.

The e-version of this book comes complete with a musical score consisting of original pieces by Lazar, who is also an accomplished composer.

Throughout Nelson’s eight years, he thinks of his Great Love.  Although he bonds with other people, it is Katey that has won his heart.

Will he ever see Katey again?  I’ll leave that for you to find out, when you read Roam.

When a poodle isn’t a poodle

Poodle vs ferret

Last month, a story circulated worldwide about a man in Argentina who had purchased what he thought was two toy poodles from a local market for a bargain price.  The poodles turned out to be ferrets that had been loaded with steroids to plump them up and make them appear more like a poodle than a ferret.

I have two things that concern me:

1.  While some people focused on debates about ‘how dumb could the guy be….?’, my thoughts were – ‘what a shocking case of abuse.’

These ferrets were loaded with damaging steroids to make money.  There was no thought given to their welfare and the impacts on their health from the steroids.

2.  There is no such thing as a free lunch.  If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is…

When dealing with animals, people really need to think about quality.  Are they buying quality?  Is it a cheap product that could damage animal health (how many cases have we seen with cheap, spot-on flea treatments and the damage that they cause?)

In this case, the buyer should have questioned the bargain price.  At a minimum, he was probably purchasing a poodle with health problems resulting from poor breeding practice.  What he got was even worse, a different species of animal that had been altered to deceive…

So, in summary, I think it is good that this story was circulated.  However, I am disappointed the track that many media took about the story.    We need to put animals first.  Welfare of the animals is top priority.

What do you think?

Are cats the only ones with 9 lives? I don’t think so.

This is the story of Suzie, believed to be a Bichon Frise/Poodle cross.  Suzie lives in Taunton, Massachusetts.

Earlier this month, Suzie got out and darted across Route 44 in front of a Toyota that was driving about 50 mph.  The driver slammed on his brakes and, not feeling anything  and not seeing the dog, he continued driving assuming he had missed Suzie.

Eleven miles later, he was flagged down by another driver in East Providence, Rhode Island who saw a little white dog wedged up behind the front grill of his car.  He drove immediately to the police and animal control officers helped rescue a wedged Suzie from the front of his car.

Suzie was extremely frightened but had no broken bones.  Her injuries included a broken tooth and a concussion.  She was soon on the mend with pain medication and antibiotics.  Her owners have taken her home and hopefully she won’t have any more close encounters with cars.

Here’s Suzie’s story which appeared on local television:

The Pitty Pat Club at The Broadmoor

The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs is a high-end, pet-friendly resort that has a long history associated with animals.  Many dignitaries including US presidents, actors and actresses, and others have stayed in the luxurious surroundings.

But my preference is the resort’s Pitty Pat Club.

The Broadmoor, Colorado Springs

Pet guests are welcomed to the Broadmoor’s own unique Best Friend in Residence Program.  A $50.00 per pet per day fee is added to your room charge.  With that surcharge, your pet receives a special Broadmoor identification tag to wear throughout their stay.   There are designated outdoor pet areas with clean up packs provided. The 24-hour Pitty Pat Pet Menu offers room service including Blue Buffalo adult dog food and health bars in three flavours:  apples and yogurt, bacon, egg & cheese, or chicken liver.

You are also encouraged to take your dog off-property in a safe manner.  A map of dog exercise areas is provided.  These off-property areas include:

  • North Cheyenne Canyon – dogs allowed on leash
  • Stratton Open Place – dogs allowed on leash
  • Bear Creek Park – off leash area called the Dog Loop Trail
  • Garden of the Gods – off leash exercise allowed in designated areas

A comprehensive list of other services is also given to dog owners.  This includes information on local veterinary practices, pet stores, and groomers.  Dog sitting and walking services can also be arranged.

If Colorado is on your list of destinations, then why not indulge yourself and your dog and stay at The Broadmoor?

The animal history (and how the Pitty Pat Club got its name):

Back in 1880, the land that the resort is situated on was a dairy farm.  In the 1890s, the owners realised that they could make more money by selling parcels of land for residential and commercial development.  A casino was built that was purchased in 1916 by Spencer Penrose, an entrepreneur from Philadelphia, and he began its transformation into a resort.

Mr Penrose saw the value of promoting Colorado Springs as a tourist destination.  He built the Pikes Peak Road leading to the summit as an alternative to the Cog Railway and he established the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, which is still considered one of the finest privately owned zoos in the United States.   Hence, another strong connection to animals.

Mr Penrose’s wife was Julie and she was accompanied everywhere by a Poodle named Pitty Pat.  So, when the resort decided to offer pet-friendly accommodation, it was a natural fit to name the program after Pitty Pat!

Daisy, this is Louie (and he’s not staying)

Several weeks ago, Daisy and I met a little dog  when we were out for our afternoon walk.   From his tag, I knew his name was Louie.  He was obviously lost and happy to follow us, but also lacked car sense (running across roads without stopping to look for traffic).   So, I encouraged him to come along with us and picked him up when we were approaching streets to cross.

I think together Daisy and I have ‘rescued’ three dogs in the last year who have lost their way from their homes.  In Louie’s case, matching him with his owner was not difficult because Louie’s owner had secured a name tag with her phone number to Louie’s collar (a move which I applaud and endorse).

Louie

Now, Daisy is an older girl and she is very congenial to all dogs and humans.  But, she prefers her routine and very young Louie was a little too much for her.  On arrival at home, she went to bed.  I went for the phone to call Louie’s owner who, as it turns out, was out of town.  She’d left Louie with a friend and he’d escaped.  Help was on the way within the next hour or so….

Daisy couldn’t help herself.  She had to come out and see what was happening in her house.  Louie wanted to play; Daisy wasn’t so sure.  Here’s a video of their encounter (latin dance music courtesy of the film that was playing on the tv at the time)…

Louie was picked up by his owner’s flatmate.

Today, my doorbell rang and Anna (owner) was there to thank me.  Louie, a Bichon/Poodle cross, decided to jump out of the car and say hello too, to both Daisy and I.  We were given a bottle of wine for our efforts (Daisy won’t indulge).  All’s well that ends well.

But Daisy is still glad we are a one-dog household…

Marilyn Monroe and her dogs

Over the course of her life, Marilyn Monroe owned a number of dogs.

A black and white mixed breed by the name of Tippy was given to then Normal Jean by her foster father.

A spaniel named Ruffles was an early companion around 1940-1942.

Her husband Jim Dougherty bought her a collie named Muggsie.

Around about the time that she was signed by Columbia Pictures in 1948, Marilyn reportedly owned a chihuahua but I can’t find a record of the name.

During her marriage to Arthur Miller, a basset hound named Hugo was their companion.  Miller retained ownership of Hugo when the couple divorced.

Marilyn Monroe and Maf, photo attributed to Eric Skipsey

Maf was a maltese given to Marilyn by Frank Sinatra.  The dog’s full name was Mafia Honey in honour of Sinatra’s alleged mafia connections.  When Marilyn died, the dog was given to Sinatra’s secretary.

In 2010, author Andrew O’Hagan documented Maf’s story in a book The Life and Opinions of Maf the Dog, and of His Friend Marilyn Monroe.  Written from Maf’s point of view, we read about Marilyn’s last two years  (she took the dog to Hollywood, New York and to Mexico).

One of Maf’s comments: “I mean, if you have to pee you have to pee and why not next to the swimming pool at the Chateau Marmont, right?”

A lot has been written about Marilyn and her all-too-short life.  What a nicer way to picture the actress than through her dog?  (Dogs don’t lie and they don’t tell tails – oops I mean tales)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand