Tag Archives: aging

Muscle loss and wasting

I encounter dogs in my practice who are experiencing muscle loss and wasting fairly often.

Since owners must submit veterinary records to me for review as part of my intake process as well as update me on any subsequent vet visits, if there’s a diagnosis of chronic illness – such as kidney disease or cancer – then this muscle loss  is understandable and classified as cachexia.

In the absence of a diagnosis of disease, and working with an aging dog, then the muscle loss is classified as sarcopenia.

Muscle loss results in a change of appearance, which owners often notice first around the shoulder blades, top of the head, and around the pelvis.  Muscle wastage can be graded as noted below:

Muscle condition score

Exercise and good nutrition can be interventions with muscle loss.  Chronically ill dogs need a high quality diet that is appropriate for their disease, for example.  And aging dogs do need exercise that is targeted to their needs and abilities.

Owners should always be on the watch for signs of muscle loss – so early interventions that are medical and non-medical can be considered.

Kathleen Crisley, Fear-Free certified professional and specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Advertisements

Inspirations

Another inspirational card shared with me on my recent course…

As you grow older

Remember what is important in life – and enjoy the weekend!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

A perspective on time, a precious resource

Time is a precious resource.  We only have so much time in our day – you don’t get any more or any less than anyone else.

I have often said that one of the most important things we have to give our dogs is our time.  Time for play, time for love, time for care…That said, since I often work with sick or elderly dogs in my massage practice, I am also very mindful of how time can get away on us.

Our dogs live at a different time scale than we do.  There are many illustrations of the this  – here’s just one:

dog age chart

With our dogs aging at a faster rate than we do,  we don’t always understand the impact of a delay.

For example:

I meet many dog owners who come to see me because they have a fear of putting their dog on medications such as those that are used for arthritis.  Let me be clear on this – although I practice natural therapies – I am not against using traditional medications like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).  Actually, quite the opposite.

Many dogs benefit from pain relief just like we humans do.

One of the better ways to assess the levels of pain in a dog is to give it a short course of NSAIDs and simply watch for changes in the dog’s behaviour and levels of activity.   If the dog improves, this is often the best indicator we have about the dog’s level of discomfort.

If pain is managed, then we can do even more hands-on work like acupressure, stretching, acupuncture and massage and this often means dosages of the ‘hard drugs’ can be reduced without sacrificing pain management.

In this example, the owner is hesitating to make a decision on using medication – even with the idea that we go into the arrangement knowing the medications will be used for only a short period – perhaps 2-3 weeks.

The dog weighs 25 kg and is 10 years old.

I start working with the dog and suggest a number of times that I believe the dog is in pain or at a minimum – uncomfortable.

The owner takes 2 months to make a decision before agreeing to try some pain relief.

In human years, since the dog is aging at a rate of 6 years to 1 human year at this life stage… 

The owner has waited the equivalent of one human year to make a decision!

 I will ask– if this was your grandma/grandpa/father/mother –  would you allow them to live like this without pain relief?

The answer has always been ‘no.’

We have a duty to care for our dogs which involves acting in their best interests.  They can’t tell us in words how much pain they are in, it’s up to us to figure it out.  And in deciding what to do, we must always be mindful of how precious time is.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand