Tag Archives: homeopathics

Before and after

Our friend Ben, a greyhound, had an accident on Saturday, 15th September 2018.

From what we can tell, he was chasing a cat who must have taken a hard right turn.  When Ben tried to follow (he was under cover of a line of bushes and trees at the time of the incident), his momentum carried him sideways into a tree.  He emitted a huge cry of pain but was luckily able to walk home slowly before being taken to the vet within 15 minutes of the crash.

His bruising wasn’t immediately apparent because bruising takes time to come up; the vet suggested that he might also have cracked a rib during the impact.

Ben's bruising after photo

Ben the greyhound shortly after the incident

But within a few hours, here’s what he looked like:

Ben's bruising before photo

Ben the greyhound on 15 September 2018

I visited with him on Saturday afternoon and again on Monday (17th September) to laser him thoroughly with specific acupressure and trigger points addressed.  To some extent, the laser helped to bring out the bruising and speed healing.  His mum was also giving him regular rubdowns with Sore No More lotion (which I use and sell in my practice) and also dosing him Traumeel drops which I also recommend to my clients as a ‘must have’ for their First Aid kits.

And today (Wednesday, 19th September 2018), I got these lovely photos of Ben who is happily out running again in the sunshine:

 

It is very rewarding to be able to help dogs using my scope of practice of massage, acupressure, and laser therapies.  It’s even more rewarding when the dog is also a close friend.

Kathleen Crisley, Fear-Free certified professional and specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

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Flower essences – are they the same as Bach flowers?

Because I’m using an emotional nutrition range in my practice, which are mixtures of flower essences and homeopathics, I have been getting asked questions about them – which is great!

People refer to them as Bach flowers, and this isn’t entirely correct.

Dr Edward Bach worked in England in the years 1930 to 1935 on his flower remedies and when he died in 1936, his system of 38 remedies in total were fully documented.  These are the true Bach flower remedies.  The most notable combination is Rescue Remedy which is widely used today in both humans and animals.

He began collecting plants and flowers – the most highly-developed part of a plant – in the hope of replacing nosodes with a series of gentler remedies.  In his research, he matched a flower essence to a particular emotional state.  Here are a few examples:

  • Gentian – for discouragement after a setback
  • Mimulus – fear of known things
  • Vine – dominance and inflexibility

The Bach flower remedies should feature the Bach signature label  (made in England) which looks like this:

Bach flower logo

The remedies are made by infusing the flowers in spring water, either by the sun-steeped method or by boiling. The remedies contain a grape-based brandy as a preservative and there are alcohol free versions which are preserved in glycerin made from sunflowers

Following on from Dr Bach’s work on flower essences, there are other flower essences that have been developed from flowers growing in other parts of the world.  For example, there’s a whole range of essences extracted from Australian bush flowers.

So when people ask me about using flower essences, I remind them that there’s a difference between essential oils and flower essences and I also explain that not all flower essences are Bach flowers.

Kathleen Crisley, Fear-Free certified professional and specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced DogChristchurch, New Zealand

Homeopathics, in pack order

The Telegraph has reported this week that Queen Elizabeth II feeds her dogs in ‘order of seniority’  and that the dogs consume a range of herbal and homeopathic remedies.

Queen with Corgi

The Queen of England couldn’t be more Establishment and yet – there she is – open-minded enough to recognise that herbals and homeopathics may help keep her Corgis in good health, for longer.

I respect her for that.

It’s long been reported and known that the Queen is an animal-lover.  Dr Mugford, an animal psychologist who has worked with the Queen’s dogs says “The Queen has definite views about how dogs should be cared for: she doesn’t tolerate unkindness, and I remember she took a very dim view of President Lyndon B Johnson picking his dogs up by their ears.”

Queen Elizabeth has made the decision fairly recently not to replace her Corgis when they pass away, which has been a long-standing tradition in her household.  This is surely a sign that the Queen is feeling the pressures of time and old age.  She doesn’t want to bring dogs into the household when it’s highly likely they will out-live her.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

 

Understanding homeopathic remedies

In my last blog post, I explained how I was going to start treating Daisy with homeopathic fragaria and calc renalis to support good dental health.

So now I’d like to remind everyone how homepathic remedies are made.

This diagram outlines the process, but doesn’t fully explain how the remedies are made.  (I was sent this diagram a long time ago and I’m not sure of the original source for it).

Homeopathic dilutions diagram

Step 1:  Make a mother tincture

The first step is to create a mother tincture out of the plant source.   The plant material is cut up and crushed and left to soak in an alcohol and water solution in a dark place for some time.  The period of soaking is long enough to draw the properties of the plant into solution.   When the maker of the remedy understands that the mixture is ready, they will strain off any residual plant material.  This is the mother tincture.

Step 2:  Potentization

One drop of the mother tincture is put into a vial and then nine drops of a solution of alcohol and water and shaken vigorously.  This results in a 1X potency.  With one drop of the 1X potency and nine drops of the diluting solution and another good shake and you have 2X potency.

For the potency of 1C, this process is done 100 times.  (C is the Roman numeral for 100).

In most cases, homeopathics start with a 6C potency.  Other common potencies are 12C, 30C and 200C.  I’m most familiar with the 30C potency which is often the starting point (it’s what I’ll be using).  However, when there’s an acute condition that requires a bit more energy, I use 200C.

It’s also important to understand how your homeopathic remedy is made.  My homeopathic vet prefers that the remedies are made by hand by an experienced homeopathic pharmacist.  Major commercial brands like Weleda, on the other hand, use a manufacturing process for potentizing.

Homeopathy is a really interesting discipline and just one of the complementary therapies available to help your dog attain and maintain optimal health.