Tag Archives: dog massage

In odd circumstances…

Yesterday, I pulled into the service station to fill the tank.  I also asked for help because I was filling a gas canister for the first time and didn’t want the nasty stuff splashing all over me.

I have advertising on my car.  In fact, it’s one of the best investments I’ve ever made.  Because of the advertising, I find myself in some odd circumstances explaining what I do.

IMG_0711

The Balanced Dog’s car

This time, it was the station attendant.  “I suppose they do that a lot in America,” he said as an opening statement.

I then replied with something of a stock-standard explanation, “for the same reasons people get massage, dogs benefit, too.  I work on dogs of all ages – those who have arthritis, some are recovering from surgery and injuries and I even help with dogs that are suffering from anxiety and stress.  Some of my clients are only young puppies to help them become calmer and used to handling.”

“Oh, I met a dog at my in-law’s holiday home who is afraid of men.  I only had to say something and the dog ran away.”

Me:  “That’s definitely a stress response.  I use massage combined with behavioral training techniques to work with dogs who have stress problems.  Last week, I started work with a puppy who gets so stressed at the thought of going in the car that she vomits.”

“Wow”

Wow indeed.

I consider every conversation an opportunity to educate people about the wellness impacts and multiple benefits of dog massage.  It isn’t just about ‘rehabbing’ from injuries – it’s a lot more!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Advertisements

Two french bulldogs and a pug

Today, I gave Aki, Haru, and Yuki their Christmas presents – relaxation massages paid for by their Dad.  I was booked up last week when he rang and couldn’t fit in 3 hours of massage before the holiday – luckily everyone was happy to wait.

All I knew was that I was going to meet “two french bulldogs and a pug.”  I was not disappointed; all three were charming.  Yuki is the oldest, and will be 8 years old in March; Aki is 5; Haru will be 2 in February.

Pug

Yuki the Pug

French Bulldog

Haru the French Bulldog

French Bulldog

Aki the French Bulldog

Massages for your dog make a wonderful gift; relaxation massage distributes the oils of the coat to support skin health, allows your dog to chill out and be the center of attention, and I report back on any lumps and bumps I find to ensure you have discussed these with your vet.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Seeing is believing

As the saying goes, “seeing is believing” and I have found that this holds true when educating people about the value of dog massage and complementary therapies.  My profession is not well known (yet) and so it’s important to me to help spread the word in a positive and enjoyable way.

Yesterday, I had a massage tent at the ASB Summer Starter, an annual fun run and walk where dogs are encouraged to participate.  This was my first year supporting the event (I tried last year but no one responded to my enquiry – so that’s progress!).

When people see how their dog responds to massage, even at a busy outdoor event like this one, it helps to open their eyes about complementary therapies.  Fit dogs can still have trigger points and knots, just like humans.  There was even a tripod on my table yesterday – healthy and happy – but a body that will need support going forward as the dog ages.

And I hate to think that people take exclusively the physio approach to their dog’s health – that is waiting until they are hurting or injured before seeking treatment. (Physiotherapy NZ’s definition of physio is ‘to help restore movement and function to anyone affected by an injury, disability or health condition’).

So yesterday was about showing people a taste of what massage and other therapies can do for their healthy dog.

Seeing is Believing.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Inspirations

Last month, I shared images of the inspiration cards that were given to me when I was working and studying at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Utah.

Tonight I share an inspiration of a different kind.

Elesha, who was mum to Kenny who passed away in April 2016, contacted me because she had found these photos on her Instagram page.    She thought I’d like them (I do!).

 

Kathleen & KennyLooking at these photos, I realise how much time has passed since I worked with Kenny.  My practice has been re-branded from Canine Catering to The Balanced Dog.  I have new shirts with a new logo and even our dog treat labels have changed.  Progress.

But the inspiration is knowing that the work I did with Kenny is still appreciated, and that Elesha stays in touch.

Kenny was a great dog and I’m lucky to have worked with him and his family.

Inspirational!

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Hank’s in-room massage

I love having sleepover dogs from Best Friends Animal Sanctuary.  When Hank (a Mastiff cross) stayed with me, I gave him an in-room relaxation massage.

At first he wasn’t sure what to expect, but he soon got into it.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Eddie

Eddie is a one-year old Staffordshire Bull Terrier, and a regular client for massage.

This little boy gets up on the table all by himself…

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Dog massage etiquette – the therapist

I’ve been doing a bit of thinking about dog massage etiquette lately.  That’s because I pride myself on running a professional practice; I have committed to ongoing professional development, and I want my clients to value professional canine massage.

Lucy relaxed at massage

Here is what clients can expect from me:

  • I will be prepared to focus on your dog and his/her issues; this includes listening carefully to what you have to say
  • I will operate only within my scope of practice
  • I will keep notes that, on request, can be sent to your dog’s veterinarian or any other practitioner you choose as part of your healthcare team
  • I encourage and endorse regular veterinary care; I often say that your dog’s vet is its GP (General Practitioner or, in United States terms, ‘The Primary Care Physician’)
  • I will turn up on time and manage my appointments so that clients are not kept waiting and, when I am running late (which happens as a mobile practitioner), I will call you
  • If I ever use an assistant, and they are not fully qualified to the level that I am, you will be told you are seeing an assistant and have the option to opt out and reschedule with me personally if you prefer.  If you agree to use the assistant, you can expect to be charged a lower hourly rate
  • I will always offer suggestions with the best interest of the dog in mind; the decision to take up my suggestions rests with you as the dog’s owner
  • I will keep your records private (your dog’s records are a form of private information under the Privacy Act)
  • Clients often chat to me when I’m working and I appreciate their trust.  Anything you tell me will be kept in confidence.  If I write about a case, it will be described in generic terms to preserve privacy.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand