Tag Archives: companionship

Doggy quote of the month for August

“The charming relations I have had with a long succession of dogs results from their happy spontaneity.  Usually they are quick to discover that I can not see or hear.  Considerately they rise as I come near, so that I may not stumble.  It is not training but love which impels them to break the silence about me with the thud of a tail rippling against my chair, or gambols round the study, or news conveyed by expressive ear, nose, and paw.  Often I yearn to give them speech, their motions are so eloquent with things they can not say.  Truly, as companions, friends, equals in opportunities of self-expression, they unfold to me the dignity of creation, and in their joy smiles the blessing of St. Francis.”

– Helen Keller in A Tribute to a Dog

Helen Keller with companions

Helen Keller with Phiz (a Boston Terrier). Photo courtesy of Perkins School for the Blind

Dogs benefit children with autism

A University of Missouri researcher has studied dog ownership decisions in families of children with autism and found that parents report a range of benefits of dog ownership including companionship, stress relief and opportunities for their children to learn responsibility.

Photo credit: Noël Zia Lee, Wikimedia Commons

Photo credit: Noël Zia Lee, Wikimedia Commons

‘Children with autism spectrum disorders often struggle with interacting with others, which can make it difficult for them to form friendships,’ said Gretchen Carlisle, the study’s author. ‘Children with autism may especially benefit from interacting with dogs, which can provide unconditional, nonjudgmental love and companionship to the children.’

Carlisle interviewed 70 parents of children with autism.  Nearly two-thirds of the parents in the study owned dogs, and of those parents, 94 percent reported their children with autism were bonded to their dogs. Even in families without dogs, 70 percent of parents said their children with autism liked dogs.

‘Bringing a dog into any family is a big step, but for families of children with autism, getting a dog should be a decision that’s taken very seriously.  If a child with autism is sensitive to loud noises, choosing a dog that is likely to bark will not provide the best match for the child and the family. If the child has touch sensitivities, perhaps a dog with a softer coat, such as a poodle, would be better than a dog with a wiry or rough coat, such as a terrier.’

The study, “Pet Dog Ownership Decisions for Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder,” was published in the Journal of Pediatric Nursing earlier this year.

Source:  University of Missouri media release

For more about the benefits of dogs for people with autism, read my post Dogs are a ‘social lubricant’ in helping people with autism

There are no bad days

There are no bad days

A thought for your weekend as you come home after work on a Friday.  (I feel this way every day that I come home to Daisy)