Tag Archives: grooming

Dog buns

It seems that there’s a new trend in grooming and photographing dogs – it’s called dog buns, as seen from these photos downloaded from Instagram and Pinterest:

Dog bundog bun 3While I understand that some people think these photos are cute or funny, I don’t agree in tying up the ears of a dog.  The ears of a dog are sensitive tissues, with many acupressure points.

Tying up of the ears can interfere with blood circulation and, if left in for any period of time, the area is a breeding ground for bacteria – particularly in wet conditions.

Leave your dog’s ears alone!  The only dog buns I like to see are these ones:

Izzy, Greyhound, adopted in October 2014 (Photo by Dany Wu)

Izzy, Greyhound, adopted in October 2014 (Photo by Dany Wu)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Dry Dog, Wet Dog

Serenah Hodson is an Australian pet photographer.  She’s just done a series entitled Dry Dog Wet Dog.  She says,

‘Dry Dog Wet dog came about with washing my own dogs. Their personalities change when they know it’s bath time. So I decided to create a series of the different looks and not only personalities but the difference in look from groomed to wet. We get such great texture on the dog when the hair is wet. Some dogs look completely different when wet and this was the joy I wanted to capture.’

Here’s a few of Serenah’s photos and  you can follow her on Facebook to see more of her work.

Garfunkel-Dry-Dog-Wet-Dog Casper-Dry-Dog-Wet-Dog Bones-Dry-Dog-Wet-Dog Henri-Dry-Dog-Wet-Dog

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Cleaning your dog’s ears

Bath time in our house is combined with a check of Daisy’s ears and teeth.  It makes sense when she’s already in the tub (and usually, looking pretty miserable)…

Bath time

When I adopted Daisy, she came down with an ear infection with days of arriving (her immune system was depressed – she’d just finished weaning her sole surviving puppy, and she was recovering from a cesarean section).  At that time, I purchased a commercial ear cleaner from the vet.

Since then, however, I’ve refilled the bottle with my own mixture of cider vinegar and water.  It’s easy:  50% vinegar to 50% water.

I never (and I mean never) introduce the liquid into Daisy’s ears.  I apply the solution with a soft wash cloth that is wrapped around my finger to clean around the ear.

This video produced by VetVid is a good explanation of how to clean your dog’s ears.

Do you check your dog’s ears regularly? What ear cleaning solution do you use?