Tag Archives: dog adoption

Another pack member

Today, I had a consult with a new client who also suddenly suffered the loss of her younger dog just a few days ago.  Since I’ve been through my own loss of Daisy in July and I am now co-sponsoring a pet loss support group in my area, I think I was able to provide her with the understanding she needed at this painful time.

We also discussed when it is ‘right’ to bring another dog into the household.  There is no single ‘right’ answer to this question.

For me, I was not doing well in a dog-less household.  I missed the companionship and unconditional love that Daisy gave me willingly for over 10 years.  But, I knew that replacing Daisy was never going to happen – she was unique.   And I don’t believe we ever replace a dog that has passed; we only open our hearts to a new relationship.

I had to find a dog that needed me as much as I needed them.

This is my way of announcing the adoption of Izzy, a greyhound, from the Greyhounds as Pets adoption scheme.

Izzy, with a selection of her toys

Izzy, with a selection of her toys

Initially withdrawn and a bit overwhelmed at being in a pet home after over 5 1/2 years in a kennel environment, Izzy is now experiencing her second puppyhood.  I have had a few household items destroyed (including a tv remote) and I’m learning to schedule play time for us at least twice daily (in addition to our twice-daily walks).

I am finding great joy in giving a home to a dog who didn’t have one.  The time was right for a new pack member;  I think Daisy loved me enough that she would approve.

In the months and years to come, I’ll be sharing stories about Izzy and our adventures together…but I have no plans to change the banner on this blog.  Daisy was my heart dog and soul mate and it is a fitting tribute to keep her image on the advertising for DoggyMom.com.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Dog eat dog

Actor Zachary Quinto is currently appearing worldwide in Star Trek:  Into Darkness.   He also appears in a lesser known short film called Dog Eat Dog, which is based on his search for an adopted dog in Los Angeles.

Says Quinto, “The story of the film is an exaggerated account of how I eventually found my rescue dog Noah, but it still reflects a bit of the reality I faced when I was looking to adopt a shelter dog.”

Sit back for the next 13 minutes and enjoy the film!

My temporary dogs

One of the great things about visiting and working at the Best Friends Animal Sanctuary is the range of dogs available for sleepovers.  Since I am on my final night of sleepovers, it is time to pay tribute to all four of my sleepover dogs…

Timothy, a one-year oldAmerican Staffordshire Terrier.  Beautiful boy with good manners.  I'm sorry we fed you so many treats in training class that we caused your diarrhea!

Timothy, a one-year old American Stafordshire Terrier. Beautiful boy with good manners. I’m sorry we fed you so many treats in training class that we caused your diarrhea!  Timothy’s underbite makes this wee boy adorable.

Chester, a Boxer cross (I think Boxer/Mastiff cross because of his wrinkles and large head size), age 7.  Chester is very bright and we practiced 'sit' during his stay.  A snuggly boy who snores!

Chester, a Boxer cross (I think Boxer/Mastiff cross because of his wrinkles and large head size), age 7. Chester is very bright and we practiced ‘sit’ during his stay. A snuggly boy who snores, I took Chester because he hadn’t been on a sleepover or outing for almost 2 months.

Madison, a young pit mix.  A fairly new arrival at Best Friends, she's not even on the website yet.  Really intelligent, and happily slept the night through.  Only drawback - she's a covers hog who enjoys the middle of the bed.

Madison, a young pit mix. A fairly new arrival at Best Friends, she’s not even on the website yet. Really intelligent, and happily slept the night through. Only drawback – she’s a covers hog who enjoys the middle of the bed.

Clover, another fairly new arrival and her photo isn't on the website yet.  A cattle dog mix, this young girl has good manners on leash and loves to disembowel toys.  A rubber chicken and a small squeaky sheep were victims during our evening together.

Clover, another fairly new arrival from Texas and her photo isn’t on the website yet. A cattle dog mix, this young girl has good manners on leash and loves to disembowel toys. A rubber chicken and a small squeaky sheep were victims during our evening together.  She also adores tummy rubs.

These dogs and many others can be viewed through the Best Friends website and so if you are thinking about adoption, this website is well worth a look.

Dogs who help soldiers

When I watched the PBS documentary Shelter Me, I was astounded at the statistics that more returned servicemen are dying by their own hands than are dying in fields of conflict like Afghanistan and Iraq.  These men and women are returning from active duty with difficulties such as post traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety-related problems.  They have difficulty adjusting to life in peacetime.

Dogs are playing a key role in helping these ex-soldiers to recover and re-enter society.  Shelter Me covers the stories of two veterans, for example, who have been paired with service dogs.

Here’s the YouTube trailer for Shelter Me:

The Boston Globe recently covered another story about the value of service dogs.  Patriot Rovers is a charity that trains dogs to be service dogs for returned servicemen and women.  The charity names the dogs after soldiers who have fallen in the line of duty.  The charity’s website is particularly poignant, with photos of the dogs and an explanation of the soldier they are named after.

In the Globe story, Natasha Young-Alicea suffers from migraines and anxiety from the time she served in the Marines and has been paired with Josh who is named after a Navy SEAL, Josh Harris.  Josh helps Young-Alicea in many ways.  One particular heart-wrenching task is to sit behind her in the checkout line at the supermarket, to avoid people approaching her from behind.  This proximity triggers anxiety.

Josh and his handler visit the parents of Josh Harris which also helps in their journey of healing.

These stories reinforce the critical role that service dogs play in our communities.  If you have spare time or dollars, please consider supporting service dog charities in your area.