Tag Archives: Daisy

Photos from Dog Mountain

It has been two years since my beloved Daisy passed away. So it seemed fitting that on a visit to Vermont this week, my mother and sister stopped at the chapel on Dog Mountain to make a donation in her memory.

Here are their photos:

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In loving memory of Daisy (2000 to 2014)

See more at Vermont’s dog chapel

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

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Memories and moving on

This is my first Christmas and holiday season without Daisy and, although I now have Izzy to nurture and care for, there are many memories I have of summer days and holidays with my special girl.

In my garden are now two daisy plants given to me by customers in the days following Daisy’s loss.  On sunny days like today, the daisies are in full bloom:

Daisy's daisies

And then it is clear that people are noticing that the addition of Izzy has changed things.  I received a lovely note in my P O Box from the ladies at the Papanui Post Shop.  It reads:

“Just a short note to say hello!  It’s good to see you smiling.  Daisy was such a kindred spirit, even though we didn’t see her much.  I’m sure she was just as gentle and lovely like you.  Kind regards, Faye and Karen (Papanui Post)

Izzy and Christmas trees are not compatible at this stage in her life; but I’m sure we will find a way of celebrating our first Christmas together.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Another pack member

Today, I had a consult with a new client who also suddenly suffered the loss of her younger dog just a few days ago.  Since I’ve been through my own loss of Daisy in July and I am now co-sponsoring a pet loss support group in my area, I think I was able to provide her with the understanding she needed at this painful time.

We also discussed when it is ‘right’ to bring another dog into the household.  There is no single ‘right’ answer to this question.

For me, I was not doing well in a dog-less household.  I missed the companionship and unconditional love that Daisy gave me willingly for over 10 years.  But, I knew that replacing Daisy was never going to happen – she was unique.   And I don’t believe we ever replace a dog that has passed; we only open our hearts to a new relationship.

I had to find a dog that needed me as much as I needed them.

This is my way of announcing the adoption of Izzy, a greyhound, from the Greyhounds as Pets adoption scheme.

Izzy, with a selection of her toys

Izzy, with a selection of her toys

Initially withdrawn and a bit overwhelmed at being in a pet home after over 5 1/2 years in a kennel environment, Izzy is now experiencing her second puppyhood.  I have had a few household items destroyed (including a tv remote) and I’m learning to schedule play time for us at least twice daily (in addition to our twice-daily walks).

I am finding great joy in giving a home to a dog who didn’t have one.  The time was right for a new pack member;  I think Daisy loved me enough that she would approve.

In the months and years to come, I’ll be sharing stories about Izzy and our adventures together…but I have no plans to change the banner on this blog.  Daisy was my heart dog and soul mate and it is a fitting tribute to keep her image on the advertising for DoggyMom.com.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Goodbye, friend

Goodbye, friend
With Daisy’s passing, it is probably not surprising that I reached for a book on grief and – more specifically – a book about grief over the loss of a pet.

I purchased this book in 2013, but when I started to read it then, it didn’t feel right.  Although aging, Daisy was still in good health and I felt like I was somehow ‘jumping the gun.’  The book went to the bottom of my ‘to read’ pile until last week when I found myself at loose ends in my empty house.

One of the biggest things about loss of a pet is, although deep down we know that our dog has a short lifespan, there is nothing that can prepare you for the emotional tidal wave that comes on the day of your dog’s death.  So, having a book to turn to for guidance is useful.

This book is written in simple terms, with some historic references to cultures and how they view death, dying and the role of pets.  It discusses the decision we face when euthanizing a sick pet, how to deal with children’s grief, understanding the need to care for yourself when grieving, and deciding when it is right to take steps that allow you to move on.

Since Kowalski is a clergyman, he has used his background to prepare a section on readings and poems that can be used in a memorial service for a lost pet.

I’m glad I had this book handy for when I had to suddenly face the loss of Daisy and, based on my experience, I would recommend to all my readers to have a book about pet grief in your ‘tool box’ for when you have to face the sad occasion of saying goodbye.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

In mourning

It is with a very heavy heart that I announce the passing of my beloved Daisy on the 26th of July.  As any dog lover will know, one of the hardest things about having a dog in your life is knowing that they do not live as long as we do and many of us will face the decision to let them pass in peace and without pain.

Daisy was 14 years, 17 days old.    Although slowing down, she always showed in an interest in twice-daily walks until about a month ago, when one afternoon she looked up at me to say “I’ve been to the toilet, now I just want to go home and rest.”  We have had more days like that – sporadically – until about the last week when once daily walks were enough for her.  After her last acupuncture treatment on Wednesday afternoon, she was very happy and energetic – walking longer and at a quicker pace than the last few weeks.

That was to be our last walk together.

One of the things that is an owner’s responsibility and duty is to manage quality of life.  In Daisy’s case, she had the look in her eye that many people describe – it told me “I’ve had enough.”

As part of my grieving process, and in tribute to my dear Daisy, here are a few photos of her life.  We were together for 10 years and 7 months – and I wish I had them to do all over again.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

 

This is one of the first photos I took of Daisy, shortly after adopting her.

This is one of the first photos I took of Daisy, shortly after adopting her

Daisy 'upgraded' to a red collar and I love this photo because it gave a better perspective to her size and conformation

Daisy ‘upgraded’ to a red collar and I love this photo because it gave a better perspective to her size and conformation

 

In 2004, Daisy allowed me to dress her in a Boston Red Sox sweatshirt to celebrate their World Series win

In 2004, Daisy allowed me to dress her in a Boston Red Sox sweatshirt to celebrate their World Series win

 

In April 2008, Daisy helped to pose in the garden to show off some new landscaping

In April 2008, Daisy helped to pose in the garden to show off some new landscaping

 

In April 2008, we celebrated Daisy's 8th birthday a wee bit in advance as part of launching Canine Catering

In April 2008, we celebrated Daisy’s 8th birthday a wee bit in advance as part of launching Canine Catering

 

In February 2011, following our big earthquake, Daisy revealed that she was suffering from arthritis in her hips and spine.  Swimming became a fortnightly activity from then on

In February 2011, following our big earthquake, Daisy revealed that she was suffering from arthritis in her hips and spine. Swimming became a fortnightly activity from then on

Daisy loved food and treats; here she enjoys a Busy Bone whilst visiting with her Uncle Guy in 2012

Daisy loved food and treats; here she enjoys a Busy Bone whilst visiting with her Uncle Guy in 2012

On her 13th birthday, I took Daisy for an off-lead walk at The Groynes as a special treat

On her 13th birthday, I took Daisy for an off-lead walk at The Groynes as a special treat

We celebrated our 10th anniversary together by taking a trip to Ruby Bay.  Daisy was so happy during our 5 days there.

We celebrated our 10th anniversary together by taking a trip to Ruby Bay. Daisy was so happy during our 5 days there.

My last photos of Daisy were taken on July 12th as part of a photo shoot for the business

My last photos of Daisy were taken on July 12th as part of a photo shoot for the business

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Wordless Wednesday, part 42

Daisy's PillowBlog Hop

Daisy’s 14th birthday cake

Yesterday, Daisy reached the geriatric age of 14 – an achievement for any larger sized dog.  We of course celebrated with a doggy birthday cake, which was a wheat-free apple and banana cake with a low fat cream cheese frosting.

I decorated the cake with a vintage Disney carousel ornament – the heat from the candles makes the carousel turn.

(Excuse the singing – it was the best I could do with a cold and sore throat)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand