Tag Archives: lost dogs

Chaos returns…

Fairfax newspapers in New Zealand are reporting on the return of Chaos, a deaf dog who went missing on 15th March.  A great story, read it here.

Waitara man Marc Glover, partner Alicia James and their 3-year-old daughter Saphire-Rose, are over the moon that their dog, Chaos, was found after going missing for eight days.  (Photo by Sam Scannell, Fairfax NZ)

Waitara man Marc Glover, partner Alicia James and their 3-year-old daughter Saphire-Rose, are over the moon that their dog, Chaos, was found after going missing for eight days. (Photo by Sam Scannell, Fairfax NZ)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

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Lost Dogs – Is your dog at risk?

I really like the checklist in this item. Sometimes, without thinking, we put our dogs at risk. Losing a dog would be one of the most heartbreaking things that any of us experience – let’s re-think our habits before it is too late.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

No Dog About It Blog

IMG_6838I’m often brought to tears by stories of lost dogs that have been found.

Just this past weekend, a ten-year-old dog was found after being lost and out on her own for several days in frigid temps. As I read her owner’s teary and thankful response to all those who helped her get her dog back, I wept.

I remember the powerful waves of emotion that swept over me when I finally had Cupcake back in my arms again – relief, gratitude, and extreme happiness. Even though it has been three years since Cupcake went missing, I have never forgotten those twelve days she was gone. I have only to read another lost dog story or see another missing dog posting, to feel all the fear, worry and sadness all over again.

Losing a dog (no matter how long) changes you. It makes you more cautious, and more attentive. It also makes you less likely…

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Daisy, this is Louie (and he’s not staying)

Several weeks ago, Daisy and I met a little dog  when we were out for our afternoon walk.   From his tag, I knew his name was Louie.  He was obviously lost and happy to follow us, but also lacked car sense (running across roads without stopping to look for traffic).   So, I encouraged him to come along with us and picked him up when we were approaching streets to cross.

I think together Daisy and I have ‘rescued’ three dogs in the last year who have lost their way from their homes.  In Louie’s case, matching him with his owner was not difficult because Louie’s owner had secured a name tag with her phone number to Louie’s collar (a move which I applaud and endorse).

Louie

Now, Daisy is an older girl and she is very congenial to all dogs and humans.  But, she prefers her routine and very young Louie was a little too much for her.  On arrival at home, she went to bed.  I went for the phone to call Louie’s owner who, as it turns out, was out of town.  She’d left Louie with a friend and he’d escaped.  Help was on the way within the next hour or so….

Daisy couldn’t help herself.  She had to come out and see what was happening in her house.  Louie wanted to play; Daisy wasn’t so sure.  Here’s a video of their encounter (latin dance music courtesy of the film that was playing on the tv at the time)…

Louie was picked up by his owner’s flatmate.

Today, my doorbell rang and Anna (owner) was there to thank me.  Louie, a Bichon/Poodle cross, decided to jump out of the car and say hello too, to both Daisy and I.  We were given a bottle of wine for our efforts (Daisy won’t indulge).  All’s well that ends well.

But Daisy is still glad we are a one-dog household…

The importance of microchipping

I’m here in Christchurch, New Zealand after our major earthquake on Tuesday (22nd February 2011).   On Tuesday afternoon, a neighbour found a dog in his yard with no collar or tags.  We took him in, because our house is secure and our fences are still in place.

He was a lovely boy and because I didn’t know his name, I called him Shake.  He slept in our bed on Tuesday evening to ride out the aftershocks and a little Rescue Remedy helped.   He was glued to my side all day Wednesday.

On Thursday I was able to get him to a local vet to have his microchip scanned.  A few more calls and I made contact with his grateful family who came to pick him up within the hour.  As it turns out, his name was Trick and he had a bath on Monday evening.  His family didn’t have time to replace his collar.  Otherwise, he would have been tagged with clear ID.

Trick relaxing in our lounge

Microchipping is now mandatory in New Zealand but if you are in a place where it is voluntary – please have it done.  You never know the circumstances that would see your dog lost and you needing to find one another again.

Best wishes to all and thanks for your kind words.  We are without basic services like sewerage but are coping with power and some limited water supply.

Trick temporarily took over Daisy’s bed

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand