Tag Archives: Maltese

Best dogs for apartment living

Did you know that the American Kennel Club has published a list of the best dogs for apartment living?

With cities growing and land prices escalating, most metropolitan areas around the globe are looking to establish neighborhoods characterized by apartments rather than single-family homes.  This move can create challenges for people wanting to ensure that dogs remain part of their lives.

Years ago for example, in New  Zealand, the main telecommunications company here used a Jack Russell Terrier named Spot in its commercials.  The breeding and demand for these dogs soared.  People thought that the dog, being small, would be good for the suburbs (let alone, apartments).  But terriers need wide-open spaces and are bred for hunting down prey like rabbits and ferrets.  The result:  lots of ill-behaved dogs and owners who were out of their depth.

I would say that this list is a starting point, many mixed-breed dogs can acclimate to apartment living with the right routine and devotion.  And small dog breeds need to be managed carefully around stairs – because a lifetime of walking up and down stairs puts a lot of strain on the back and shoulders….

The best dog breeds for apartment living are:

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

The Pug

The Pug

The Shih Tzu

The Shih Tzu

The Bulldog

The Bulldog

The Bichon Frise

The Bichon Frise

The French Bulldog

The French Bulldog

IMG_0265

The Greyhound

The Chinese Crested

The Chinese Crested

The Havanese

The Havanese

The Maltese

The Maltese

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

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This is my last will and testament…

If you love your dog, you should consider what would happen if you died.  Who would care for them?  One way of dealing with this issue is to have a pet trust.

To establish a pet trust you need to:

  • Nominate a trustee
  • Designate a caregiver (it would be best to consult this person in advance and make sure they are happy with the responsibility)
  • Set aside a nominated amount of funding for the trust
  • Clearly state what standard of care your dog should receive
  • Establish the trust’s duration (a certain length of time, likely to cover the rest of your dog’s natural life)
  • Designate a beneficiary who will receive any remaining funds once your dog passes
  • Name your dog(s) to be covered by the trust

Here are some more notable bequests to dogs:

Leona Helmsley (The Queen of Mean) set up a pet trust for her Maltese, Trouble.  It was a whopping $12 million.  After the will was contested, the dog’s trust was reduced by $10 million.

Leona Helmsley with her dog, Trouble

Leona Helmsley with her dog, Trouble

In 2010, socialite Gail Posner left a home and a $3 million trust fund to her three dogs.   These dogs were very pampered and were said to have been given weekly spa appointments, traveling to those appointments in a gold Cadillac. Conchita, a Chihuahua, April Maria, a Maltese, and Lucia, a Yorkshire Terrier were the beneficiaries.

Before both of these ladies made their bequests, there was German Countess Carlotta Liebenstein.  She left approximately £43 million to her pet dog Gunther III when she died in 1991.  Gunther III and his son, Gunther IV,  enjoyed the services of a personal maid, chauffeur and a pool.

In 2004, after 10 years of contention, the bank that served as executor for tobacco heiress Doris Duke’s estate agreed to compensate the caretakers of her dogs.  Although Duke had made provision for them in her will, the will was contested for a number of reasons.  The settlement involved over $100,000 to pay two of Duke’s former servants who were responsible for feeding, medicating and cleaning up after the dogs.  Two of the dogs died over the 10 years of fighting.  Only Robert, an old shepherd cross remained.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Marilyn Monroe and her dogs

Over the course of her life, Marilyn Monroe owned a number of dogs.

A black and white mixed breed by the name of Tippy was given to then Normal Jean by her foster father.

A spaniel named Ruffles was an early companion around 1940-1942.

Her husband Jim Dougherty bought her a collie named Muggsie.

Around about the time that she was signed by Columbia Pictures in 1948, Marilyn reportedly owned a chihuahua but I can’t find a record of the name.

During her marriage to Arthur Miller, a basset hound named Hugo was their companion.  Miller retained ownership of Hugo when the couple divorced.

Marilyn Monroe and Maf, photo attributed to Eric Skipsey

Maf was a maltese given to Marilyn by Frank Sinatra.  The dog’s full name was Mafia Honey in honour of Sinatra’s alleged mafia connections.  When Marilyn died, the dog was given to Sinatra’s secretary.

In 2010, author Andrew O’Hagan documented Maf’s story in a book The Life and Opinions of Maf the Dog, and of His Friend Marilyn Monroe.  Written from Maf’s point of view, we read about Marilyn’s last two years  (she took the dog to Hollywood, New York and to Mexico).

One of Maf’s comments: “I mean, if you have to pee you have to pee and why not next to the swimming pool at the Chateau Marmont, right?”

A lot has been written about Marilyn and her all-too-short life.  What a nicer way to picture the actress than through her dog?  (Dogs don’t lie and they don’t tell tails – oops I mean tales)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand

Dognapping case in Sydney, Australia

The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting on a case of quadruple dognapping in Sydney.

Four of businessman Ian Lazar’s dogs were taken on July 21.  They are Goldberg, a miniature poodle, Bella and Lilly, Maltese shih-tzus and Max, a Maltese terrier.  $300,000 has been demanded as ransom.  Three other dogs were left behind.

Mr Lazar is a colourful character, but he proudly states that his dogs are his babies and that he fought for their custody when he divorced his wife.

A reward is being offered for information that will lead to the safe return of the dogs.

Read the full story here.

Providing for your dog in your will

News has broken this week that Trouble, the Maltese previously owned by Leona Helmsley (‘The Queen of Mean’), died in December.  Helmsley left a US$12 million trust fund when she died in 2007 for the care of Trouble.  This amount was later reduced to US$2 million when relatives challenged the will.

If you are thinking about providing for your dog in your will – there is a right way and wrong way to do it.

Right way:  Check into the regulations in your area about establishing trust funds for the benefit of your pet’s care and open the trust fund now, making regular contributions.   Make sure you nominate someone to care for your dog after you have died, using the funds in the trust.

If pet trusts are not allowed in your area, you need to nominate a carer for your dog and then leave them money to support your dog’s care.

Wrong way:  Don’t leave money to your dog in your will.  Whether we like it or not, dogs are considered property and this status means that they cannot inherit money.  The money you leave to your dog will likely be re-distributed to other beneficiaries.

Here’s a good (and brief) article about providing for your dog in your will.