Tag Archives: ownership

How much will a pet really cost you?

Izzy adoption announcementIn case you haven’t guessed, I love dogs.

But any way you look at it, dogs are a responsibility and they require commitment in time and money to support and to care for them throughout their lives.

That’s why this article, How much will a pet really cost you? A cat vs dog breakdown, caught my attention.  Published in the Christian Science Monitor and using costs in US$, it shows the cost of owning either a cat or a dog and the money you need to expect to pay on a monthly and yearly basis.

I would add that if a dog develops a special health condition, or when it ages, your costs are likely to increase.  Here in New Zealand, I am finding too many owners who are in a financial pinch because of the care of an elderly or special needs dog.  In some cases, and in my opinion, the dogs are not receiving everything that that could to make them happy and comfortable (possibly extending their lives by months or years) – because the owners don’t have the finances.

Think before you adopt (or buy).

A dog is a lifetime commitment and one that costs money.  The benefits of ownership are a great investment.

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, Canine Catering Ltd, Christchurch, New Zealand

Top 10 medical conditions for dogs

VPI™ Pet Insurance is the largest insurer of pets in the United States.  Each year, the company compiles statistics on the most common conditions that policy holders submit claims for.

The purpose of compiling this list is to show dog owners how some of the problems that their dog may have had in the past could be covered by pet insurance.  It’s a marketing exercise, of course, but it is useful.

In 2010, the top ten conditions for dogs were:

1)      Ear infection

2)      Skin allergy

3)      Skin allergy or hot spots

4)      Gastritis/vomiting

5)      Enteritis/diarrhoea

6)      Arthritis

7)      Bladder infection

8)      Soft tissue trauma

9)      Non-cancerous tumour

10)   Hypothyroidism

Pet insurance is an individual choice and you need to consider your dog’s risk profile, your ability to pay premiums, weighed up against your ability to fund medical bills in the future and your preferences for types of medical or specialist care for your dog.

The best way to make a decision about purchasing insurance is to do your homework.  Information such as this list put out by VPI can help inform your decision.

For my New Zealand readers, see my earlier blogs on coverage of massage/physiotherapy by New Zealand pet insurers.

Will my dog’s massage be covered by our insurance, Part I (Pet n Sur)

Will my dog’s massage be covered by our insurance, Part II (Petplan)

Will my dog’s massage be covered by our insurance, Part III (Ellenco)

Will my dog’s massage be covered by our insurance, Part IV (Petprotect)

Kathleen Crisley, specialist in dog massage, rehabilitation and nutrition/food therapy, The Balanced Dog, Christchurch, New Zealand